Sports Reflexology

June 29, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

Reflexology and Golf

Summertime, and the living is easy… I love that song. Along with summer comes all of the summer sports and golf is one of the most popular sports in the world. It is estimated that between 28 million to 35 million play golf worldwide.

In addition to the huge number of golfers, the standard of the game and the players has also gone up. It’s turned from being a leisurely afternoon game to high intensity competition. And, like any other sport, even golfers need to maintain their health and stamina – as they say, “a golf game starts from the ground up”. It’s especially important for a golfer to plant their feet firmly on the ground.

Stress and tensions that are held in the body can affect the quality of the game they play. It can lead to strains and injuries. An overdose of the game might be another reason that can lead to wear and tear on the body which can then further lead to unwanted injuries.

For a long time now, I’ve thought that opening a reflexology chair site at a busy golf course is a great way to introduce the health benefits of reflexology and also tap into a niche market for the summer season (here in Florida it’s year-round.

It’s so easy and much less hassle than other modalities because all the golfer has to do is to take off their shoes (and you can offer that service as an added, pampering bonus). Not to mention that golfers can be almost fanatical about their game and most will do anything and pay anything to improve their game.

Everyone knows that proper warm-ups and workouts are needed to maintain the body in good shape and prevent injuries. But golfers are not necessarily the most dedicated group for pre and post sport exercise. Reflexology is definitely an option which helps to fight back on injuries and strains. It’s been proved that reflexology helps to relax the body which can also increase flexibility and help to prevent further probable injury.

Here are some of the reflex sites that I commonly address for maintenance on possible strains and injuries common to golfers:

  • The area around the neck gets sore; this can be due to excessive force in hitting the ball. Paying attention to the 7 cervical vertebrae reflexes and the foot reflex for the trapezius is specifically helpful here.
  • Hands, forearms are another area prone to injury due to gripping and swinging of club all of which is very manageable with Hand Reflexology.
  • Elbows are the next area highly prone to injury due to the swinging of the club. You’ve heard of tennis elbow, well, if the pain is on the other side of the elbow, it’s referred to as “golfers elbow“. Any issue with a name like that… need I say more? And, yes we have an elbow reflex to work at the bases of the fifth metatarsals and metacarpals. Now is it’s time to shine!
  • For the lower body, which is susceptible due to the playing stance, reflexology can help to rejuvenate the entire body with special attention paid to the lower thoracic and lumbar vertebrae reflex area. In addition, the reflexes of the legs, hops and knees can be addressed.

So, if you want to add some extra income (and even learn a few pointers about the game) check out your local golf club and start swinging.


Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

One Reflexology Question Not to Miss

June 27, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

As reflexologists, we all keep records of our clients contact information and health history, including what their chief complaints are.

It’s a standard in the field and if you’re nationally ARCB certified, you already have what I think is the best client intake form ever. For those of you who aren’t (why wouldn’t you be?) there are client health history forms in many books.

Some intake forms are long and some are short, but there’s one very important question that I hope you are asking.

On the surface this question might not seem as important as many of the others. Don’t be fooled by how simple it is. Early in my career, I wasn’t sure how important it was but I quickly learned its value, and now I never start without it:

“How would you rate your present state of health? (circle one) Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor.”

That’s it. Almost…

It’s not enough to stop there because after getting the answer, I then need to ask one more question.

After looking at the client’s answer, my next question is… “and what would it take for you to say _____”?

For example, if they reported an answer of “Good”, next I’ll say “and what would it take for you to say – Excellent”?

If they reported Fair, I’ll say “and what would it take for you to say, Good… or Excellent”?

If they reported Poor, I’ll say “and what would it take for you to say, Fair… Good… or Excellent”?

The only time I don’t use this second question is if they say they already rate their current health as “Excellent”. There’s always room for improvement, but I usually take an “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” attitude here.

Okay, getting back to the second question… are you seeing a pattern here?

Why would I want to know what it would take for some improvement to occur? Haven’t I already gotten information about past and recent illness, injury, etc.

Yes indeed. And I will definitely work to help the organ system reflexes, but this particular question is more about quality of life. It points to health goals and personal goals like no other question can.

Let me give you an example: “Client 1” reports that they would rate their present state of health as “Good”. (Remember, I already have the health history, so it’s great information in addition to all the rest.)

I’ll ask: “and what would it take for you to say… Excellent”?

They might report that they are trying to lose some weight, or report that they would like to exercise more, or have some time for themselves.

That’s when I become a “cheer-leader” for these quality of life goals.

Once I have this information I can align with supporting them in this aspect of their journey as well.

I’ll have suggestions or referrals to make. It might be simple ideas about exercise or diet, or I might know someone who I can refer them to for more expert advice.

Sometimes just talking about these goals will start the wheels turning in their head as well as mine… and sometimes not. I never force the conversation and I will ask for their permission before I make my suggestions. That way I’ll stay within their expectations for a reflexology session and my scope of practice.

This is always a great component to the session, so don’t lose out on this additional supportive opportunity.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology & Restless Leg Syndrome

June 18, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

Here’s a report from one of my students on her experience with Restless Leg Syndrome and her Dad.

“My most interesting experience I’ve had as a reflexology student are sessions with an elderly client, my father, age 76. He has many health issues but is no feeble senior.

He’s built like an ox and continues to have a lot of energy. Nevertheless, he needs many medications to keep him healthy.

The health problems he faces are high blood pressure, history of 2 heart attacks, remission of prostate cancer, urinary tract infections and incontinence. [ ] He is overweight and doesn’t sleep well as he stops breathing during sleep and has restless leg syndrome.

Reflexology, being a gentle form of accessing the body’s own healing abilities, gives me a way I can help my dad to feel better and help his body create a healing response.

The sessions we’ve had together follow a pattern. I start the session using relaxation techniques and within 5-10 minutes, he is dozing off.

During the session, his legs draw toward his chest, somewhat like he is riding a bike. I keep a hold of his foot at whatever spot I am at while his foot dorsiflexes away from me.

At this point, I use deep pressure at the solar plexus reflex and gradually the foot and leg release and return to resting position. I like to think of this a reflexology dance we go through!

It’s truly amazing to see how powerful the solar plexus reflex is in this case. No other reflex points seem to help as fast to calm the foot and leg.

While this is going on, my dad also “holds” his breath and then lets it out with a “poof” when the leg and foot relax. Because of this, I always detail his diaphragm and heart reflexes as they are working so hard.

The first session with my dad, I was a bit uncomfortable with the feet pulling away, as I wondered if this meant his body didn’t like reflexology.

Using the universal relaxing reflex point of the solar plexus makes all the difference, so I know I’m just helping his body to process the tissues and fluids being moved.

I now enjoy the sessions and look forward to them, knowing my dad sleeps more soundly after these.

He usually takes a nap after, and was not aware of his leg movements during the sessions.

I hope continuous sessions will help improve his ability to breathe easier and sleep deeper.

– Elaine T.

Wendy’s note:

Restless leg syndrome or RLS, is a neurological disorder that effects approximately 5 million adults and up to 1 million children in the US alone.

The hallmark of this syndrome is, as the name says, restlessness in the legs and sometimes described as a tingling sensation, or “irritability” of the legs along with an urge to move them.

These sensations usually come when the legs are at rest, so they can interrupt sleep or efforts to rest and relax.

Whether the RLS is constant or intermittent, temporary relief can come almost immediately when the legs are moved and are active.

With no specific known cause and affecting young and old, RLS often worsens with age. Some causes of RLS are thought to be symptoms related to diabetes, pregnancy and sometimes it’s also associated with anemia.

Be careful as a reflexologist that you are not diagnosing this or any other disease. If a client tells me that they have RLS, I ask them who diagnosed it. The source should be a qualified medical professional and not a neighbor or their uncle Bob!

Restless Leg Syndrome is different from Periodic Limb Movement. Although they share some similarities they are in fact separate conditions.

In addition to the reflexes that Elaine mentioned above, I would also include the following into my protocol:

The CNS Reflexes, including the Solar Plexus and Sciatic Nerve Reflexes

The Musculo-Skeletal System Reflexes, including the Diaphragm, Lumbar Spine, Sacrum, Pelvis and Leg, Hip & Knee Reflexes.

The Immune System Reflexes, including the Spleen Reflex (support for anemia).

– And any other reflexes that may be contributing, i.e., if there is diabetes (and it’s controlled), I’ll also include the reflex to the pancreas, etc.

Reflexology tends to work especially well with chronic conditions so it’s always worth trying. Keep good notes and share your experiences.
Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology & Yorick

June 18, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

Hamlet: “Alas, poor Yorick! …he hath borne me on his back a thousand times.”

Yorick’s skull: “If you ask me, I’m still carrying the whole scene!”

— Christopher Reeve as Hamlet, on The Muppet Show

It’s hard for me to believe that even today, there are people who can’t tell the difference between reflexology and massage.

Now there’s nothing wrong with massage and a good foot massage can be wonderful. It’s a personal preference and personally, I’ll keep looking until I find an actual reflexologist.

When I went to massage school I knew, as soon as my neck sent shooting tingles and numbness down my right arm, that at my age I was not going to last long in such a labor-intensive field.

(In a recent job analysis it was found that the average age of a reflexologist is 51 and she already has a college education. While researching massage, I found that on average a massage therapist is no longer working in the field after about 2 years, in part because of the strain on the body.)

But because of my training, I can now say with some authority that reflexology has little or nothing to do with massage and here, quite simply, is the reason why.

The focus of massage is the soft tissue of the body. When giving a massage, the focus is predominantly on the muscles, tendons, ligaments, attachments, connective tissue, etc.

Sure, when giving a massage you consider the whole body, but I guarantee that when a massage therapist is working on the gastrocnemius their focus is on the leg, the back, and not on a specific organ – like the kidneys, the colon or any other organ in the body.

But, when I work with reflexology, my focus is almost entirely aimed towards the organ systems of the body. I care less about the foot – it’s muscles and attachments – than I do about the kidneys, the liver, the large and small intestines, the heart or the thyroid, to name a few. And, although I’m not treating these organs, as a reflexologist my goal is to “energetically” support their function.

The focus of massage is on the muscles. The focus of reflexology is on the organs. Period.

If we take a look at the history of reflexology, it’s closest parallel is more likely to be with chiropractics than with massage.

Now this, I can understand. (And, no – there is no bone crunching with reflexology… ever!)

The premise of chiropractics is that the alignment of the spine has an impact on all of the organs on the body. Therefore good spine alignment is necessary for optimum health and poor alignment can impact the organs in a negative way.

Of course spinal alignment can be an aggressive procedure and in the mid 1900’s there were several well-publicized cases where people died from chiropractics.

I believe this was one of the reasons that, as recently as the 1960’s, chiropractics was outlawed (as in not legal to practice) in many states – including New York!

Another reason proved to be what I call “turf wars” between chiropractors and allopathic medicine.

They had to fight for many years and their case went through several court systems until eventually a U. S. District Court Judge decided that the American Medical Association “had engaged in a lengthy, systematic, successful and unlawful boycott, designed to eliminate the profession of chiropractic as a competitor.”

But now, instead of being called “an unscientific cult” and “the chiropractic menace”, you can become a Doctor of Chiropractics.

As for the science and medicine behind chiropractics, they have a similar anecdotal history with no absolute scientific proof, just like reflexology.

I’ve never heard of reflexology causing death but maybe in the early days, while our histories were more parallel, if it had…. we’d all be “Doctors of Reflexology” too.

I’m truly glad that our gentle, non-invasive techniques have never been proven to harm anyone… but please, don’t tell me that reflexology is massage either.

chirobase.org/05RB/BCC/postscript.html

chiroeco.com/news/chiropractic-news.php?id=2685

wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_chiropractic

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.comand join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

15 Tips for Career Longevity

June 1, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

After practicing reflexology for 20 years, I’ve noticed a few things that work and a some that don’t. Today I’ve compiled a list of the most important things to do for career longevity.

I call it my “Reflexology Career Longevity Ergonomic Check List”. Take a look and see where you stand (or sit):

  1.  Are you sitting comfortably in your chair? Sounds simple, but I find a lot of students are so focused on their work that they loose track of good posture.
  2. Are you sitting half way between the front and back of the chair seat? This position will give you the maximum amount of room to turn or pivot in your chair.
  3. If you have a sore back or existing back condition, have you supported your back appropriately? This is the exception to the item above because you must support your back if that’s what it needs. Don’t forget that twisting your back is not an option and a chair with wheels may be necessary.
  4. Do you have your feet planted firmly on the floor? Hello. Put both feet on the floor for the best ergonomics and grounding. If you need a small stool, have one nearby.
  5. Is the table at a comfortable height? Is it approximately at elbow height? Table height will be different for everyone but in general don’t have your hands too high or too low when you’re working.
  6. Are your shoulders relaxed when doing the work? If they start to hurt, holding tension your shoulders while working is likely the culprit – pay attention to this especially if you have a previous injury.
  7. Are your wrists and hands aligned and in a comfortable “relaxed and straight” position? Remember to change hand direction and not use your dominant hand for all the work. Keeping wrists relaxed and relatively straight will minimize strain.
  8. Is there room at the end of the table for your arms to be supported? I like my clients feet on the table so I can rest my arms while working. If you like the feet off the table, well, I don’t know how you keep your arms up for 6 or 7 hours a day… if they do get tired, I invite you to try my method.
  9. Do you hold the foot with a loose, relaxed hand? When practitioners are just starting out there is a lot to pay attention to – okay, there is always a lot to pay attention to – and I’ve observed some students use a hold that I call “the death grip”. They are hanging on for dear life. Lighten up, especially while doing the relaxation techniques.
  10. Do you use a moderate touch while thumb-walking? There is a range of techniques and pressures and you need to know how to do them all because there is a time and a place for everything. However, there are many reflexologists who do just fine with the lightest of touch and others who have the physical strength and the inclination to go deep and stay there. Both of these styles and all those in between work, so use the pressure that will give you in the best ergonomics.
  11. Do you change postures regularly? Movement is so important. The more you can move the less apt you’ll be to stay in a position that’s not working for you.
  12. Do you take a break and stretch between sessions or at least once every hour? Those of you who do yoga know that when you do a twist or a stretch, you do a counter twist or stretch soon after. Because we often reach forward with our arms, a counter stretch and shaking out the arms makes sense too.
  13. Do you occasionally stand to work? I love to stand at various points during a session to get a better position for working and it reminds me to stay loose.
  14. Do you vary your thumb-walking to suit the angle or surface texture of the foot? Change directions and/or change hands so you can get deeper into the tissue from a different angle. This is not about pressure it’s about connecting with the reflexes.
  15. Do you insert relaxation techniques within the session for variety and ergonomic relief? I do this all the time. I call them desserts and before or after I detail an area, or if the client has felt some sensitivity, I reward them (and me) with a yummy relaxation technique.

I know you’re doing most of these things, but if you find even one item on this list that could be improved… well, my work here is done.

It pays to take care of yourself and your ergonomics. The reward can be a long and prosperous career.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills. Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

 

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training “THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”