Reflexology Business Ready?

September 19, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

Reflexology and How to Improve Your Business by Changing One Thing a Day:

I love the business end of reflexology although there once was a time when I didn’t. It took me years to overcome my disinterest in things that didn’t involve just the reflexology techniques.

Now, I’ve studied and practiced business and marketing just as hard as I did my craft. I even have a Business Telephone Buddy – someone I talk to every working day for 15 – 20 minutes. It can sometimes be hard when you work for yourself to keep the motivation steady, day in and day out. But these phone calls really help to keep me accountable to my goals and projects.

With someone to witness my steps forward and steps back, it’s a lot easier to stay focused on what I’ve dedicated myself to. I find it works best to have a buddy who is not in the same business, but not too far off in the other direction either. This way we can bounce ideas off each other and share our different tools, techniques and perspectives along the way.

Recently, my buddy announced that she was going to dedicate the next 30 days to doing something different to market her business, in a completely different way, every day. Not just different one day from the other, but different as in brand new approaches or systems she’s never tried before.

This isn’t a new idea, but it took my breath away the moment I heard it. It’s a well known fact that if you want to change a pattern, it takes 21 – 28 days to re-wire yourself to the new pattern.

Genius, I thought!… and, I’m going to do it too. So I picked a project – I’m a little superstitious, so I don’t want to tell you exactly what it is, but I’ve been trying to get a rhythm going around it (without success) for about a year!

Now, every day, for the next 30 days, I’m going to do at least one task that will be directly focused on this old avoidance pattern and make it into an inclusion pattern.

And, it’s working already. I’m heading straight into doing one task towards this goal, every day. I must say that having a buddy to witness my progress is setting me straight. I’m good at motivating myself (except in this one area) but now that task gets completed even if it’s only moments before our call.

In fact, it’s working so well that I want to invite you to do the same. Yes, it’s better with a buddy, but you can try it on your own too.

Are you ready?

How to Improve Your Business by Changing One Thing a Day:

Here are the 5 steps to get you started. Remember, it’s not about a 360 turn-around, it’s more about even, steady, consistent steps each day. It’s not forever either, so you will have to be creative.

1. Choose your task or goal (make sure it’s doable).

First decide what you want to change, improve or update.

2. Print out a calendar and mark out 30 days.

This is a great reminder, especially if you keep it by your table, on your desk or even next to your bed. Make sure it doesn’t interrupt your sleep, but it might be nice to wake up to what you goal or project is.

3. Do at least one thing towards that goal everyday.

Don’t… I repeat, do not make it too big of a task. It will likely undermine you if it’s seen as too big or becomes too overwhelming. Write out the larger parts and break them down into 15 or 30 minute tasks. If you’re having trouble with any one task, just do one minute of it that day… trust me, you can get even more done that way.

4. Make it something different from what you’ve done in the past.

It’s not the thing you know to do. It’s not the thing that you’ve already done. It’s finding unique or novel ways of doing something. Do make it an adventure and work out some completely different strategies or processes, even if at the start you’re not sure exactly what you’re doing. As long as no animals are harmed, you’ll be doing a good thing and learning something new.

5. Make the goal around anything you want to change.

If you are burnt out make it around saying no to 3 things every day. And, I don’t mean no in a stubborn way, but no as in – Nope, I need to take care of me and it’s just going to have to wait a bit longer.

Or, if you want to get more clients, call a past client one day, send out an email blast another day, set up shop at your local gym or yoga studio another day… Just make it anything that you haven’t done before.

Now, if you complete this – after 30 days you will have moved forward in ways you never would have thought possible and you’ll also establish a new pattern (so make it a good one).

And send an email to share some of your successes with me. info@reflexologyprof.com – I just might add them to a future newsletter and that way, together we can motivate others. I’ll look forward to hearing from you.
Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology and Feng Shui

August 27, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

 

“Feng Shui – Supporting the Body by Balancing the Room, What Every Practitioner Should Know”

Over and over again, I see clients who have chronic issues and wonder why, despite all of their hard work, their progress or recovery seems so slow.

Could it be that there is something else contributing to the issue that may be beyond the body? Can our body be affected by the things that surround us? And, if we’re so sensitive to our environments – could there be more to it than meets the eye?

These are all questions that Feng Shui can and does answer. The answer, of course, is – Yes!

For well over 5,000 years of observation and practice, Feng Shui has evolved into a sophisticated and complex system for supporting the living and working spaces so that our environments can also support us, or at least not hinder our lives while we inhabit them. It works for any room (as well as for large tracts of land, but that is a whole other subject).

Because of the length of the topic, I’ll stick with a few suggestions that you, as a practitioner or anyone who wants to uplift their environment, can do immediately.

Let’s start with your healing space, the room that you practice reflexology in.

1. Sit in the location of optimum support.

First, stand in the doorway of this room and look into it. Notice if the direction you sit while practicing is facing the door. If it’s your back that you would see (while sitting in the chair that you commonly use), it’s time to move.

The most auspicious direction to face, in any room for optimum health and success, is the direction facing the door.

But wait. You don’t want to be right in front of the door either. Too much energy is coming in there and this practice is all about balance. Instead you want to be situated in the opposite corner of the room, away from the door, but facing it.

You might think that this is the best place for your client to face. It is after all, their health that needs the support. And, yes, you’d be right but this room is your practice space.

It would be good to suggest that while at home your client is positioned so they face the door while sleeping in bed or at their office desk while they work.

Since this is your office or practice room (and they will only be visiting for an hour or so at a time), make it work for you. This way you’ll have the energy balance to best help all of your clients. (There’s a reason they say in an airplane, “put your mask on first and then help the person next to you”.)

2. Clear out the clutter.

Too much stuff – especially things that have not been used in a while (6-12 months) will create an area of energy stagnation in the space. You know what happens in the body if stagnation occurs… it can effect the lymphatic and circulatory systems and might even be life threatening.

This doesn’t mean that you have to throw out all of your things either. It’s all about balance, which is easier to maintain when energy is flowing, so don’t let the energy in your room drag you down.

3. Let nature flow.

Rooms can get stuffy especially when the temperatures are very hot or very cold. We tend to close everything up so we don’t waste electricity, but we might be blocking another kind of energy.

It’s important to let the air flow from the outside to the inside, and from the inside to the outside. In extreme temperatures, you don’t have to leave the windows and/or doors open for too long, but it’s still a good energy balancing technique to air rooms out on a regular basis, especially since you are working with many different people and issues in your practice…

Out with the old (and stagnant) and in with the new and fresh!

Have you noticed how all of these techniques occur in different forms in many different cultures from around the globe? I always take that as an excellent confirmation that they work.

Start with these three Feng Shui techniques and I’m sure you’ll notice a difference in the energy of the room right away.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology and Infertility

August 6, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

The versatility of reflexology never ceases to amaze me.

Over the past several years I’ve seen an increase in the number of people who come to complementary and alternative medicine, for support of other treatments.

Reflexology and Infertility is just one of them.

In fact, it’s both men and women (and it should be both because this is hugely a couples thing) but, the larger numbers by far are women.

Let me say just one thing before continuing: reflexologists never diagnose, treat, or prescribe. If there is an illness or pathology you must see a medical doctor.

And, why wouldn’t you want to get the medical diagnosis and find out what the prescribed treatment is. Once done, you can choose whatever complementary modality – yes, read reflexology here – to help your body to help itself.

In reality the healer is really inside the body that needs the healing. Nothing else can take its place.

But our stress-relieving techniques also support most medical interventions and processes. And sometimes this support is what is needed the most.

This brings me back to our topic of infertility. Let me start at the beginning.

When learning about the body and its systems, I was fascinated to find out that for of the reproductive system there are primary and secondary components.

The primary reproductive system is comprised of the ovaries and testes. That’s it. And, the secondary part is… everything else.

It made me wonder – why only one primary organ and no t any of the other parts of the system.

Well, the primary is the only part that is also a member of the endocrine system – the hormone producing, regulating system of the body.

Let’s face it, as a species, we’re designed to do something very important in order for the species to survive. You guessed it, we’re designed to reproduce.

That’s why the endocrine glands are primary, that’s why everything else comes in second place – because without the parts that regulate, that give the all important instructions, well, in a way, nothing else really matters, does it?

Now, what happens when good evolution slows down?

That’s where we get issues with infertility, or, as some would call it, sub-fertility.

I like that second term because a lot of times it’s not broken, just a bit slow.

Again, knowing the “how’s and whys” is not our job, even though we can and should be knowledgeable.

Most importantly, reflexology can and does support the body in its own natural processes – balancing and healing.

Now, there seems to be a ground swell in regards to people seeking reflexology for infertility.

Maybe the information about reflexology is being passed around amongst those in need, perhaps in the clinics or the chat rooms.

I’ve noticed that over the past few years, there’s a definite increase in interest.

And, why wouldn’t there be?

Some reflexologists have made it a specialty. And, I personally have seen up to an 80% success rate with my reflexology clients who come for support with this particular goal.

That’s right – up to 80% have been successful. Happy everybody.

So what does that mean for reflexologists?

Well, the information we get is really an anecdotal statistic. I can’t, nor would I even want to ever claim to cure anything.

I have long contended that one of the most powerful things we do in our reflexology is to relax the body. And when stress is relieved a body does tend to work better in all its functions – powerfully and positively.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, one of the most important things that supports healing is touch – touch that is safe & compassionate, touch that is about the focus, the concentration, the listening and being non-invasive.

This touch is truly a universal healer. And, that’s the touch I’m talking about.

So what can a reflexologist do?

Now, here in America, there’s a commonly held belief that it’s best to cease doing our fabulous reflexology in the first trimester of pregnancy.

I do just that.

But here, there’s an issue of infertility, not pregnancy.

Common wisdom tells us to detail the reproductive organ reflexes, the endocrine reflexes, CNS reflexes and the lymphatic reflexes.

Why?

Because this support is not just aimed at relaxation for the body… it’s not just about the stress relief. It’s also about strengthening whatever needs strengthened so that the internal environment can be the best and strongest it can possibly be.

And, if fertility treatments are happening, then everyone’s on a schedule. There is a definite pattern… support, support, support, and then wait, wait, wait.

I do the same thing in scheduling my hope-to-be-pregnant clients – session, session, session and then after their treatment, wait, wait, wait.

Of course, pregnant women need their feet worked on. So once the pregnancy is past the first trimester, and there are no complications, I work on just about everything but the reproductive reflexes because they’re already happy!

Always remember, when in doubt about giving reflexology to anyone, at anytime – you must talk to a medical professional.

You won’t get medical advice from your instructor… unless they’re a doctor!

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

The Reflexology Professor’s 7 Top Tips for Talks – Positioning Yourself as an Expert

July 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

1. Start with a Plan

There’s a bit of work to do to get you started. First and foremost, you’ll need to know:

– Who is your audience?

Think about who your audience will be so you can customize your talk to be of interest to those listeners. It makes a difference if your talk is being given at a retirement community or at a conference for podiatrists.

– What will the topic be?

Sounds simple… and your answer is reflexology of course, but there are many aspects to this great modality and you’ll need to narrow it down to match your audience. Other considerations are the amount of time you have and what you want to accomplish in that time. It’s always good to talk from your own experience, so pick a topic that is not only relevant but one where you can offer some good examples and anecdotal information.

2. Time for Preparation

It’s not always possible to just show up and talk. Sometimes you have to co-ordinate some or all of the logistics too.

– Where is the talk to be held? Who is responsible for organizing it? Will they provide the audience or will you?

– Know how to get to your venue then arrive early. Know what’s expected of you and stay within your time frame.

When it comes to preparing the talk, one of the most often used formula is writing an outline and putting it onto cards and then using these to speak from. Another popular method is to write out the whole talk and then practicing the speech until you can do it without erring.

Try to avoid reading from a script, word for word (and with little eye contact with the audience). Equally disastrous is winging it and having no prompts at all. (Unless you are very well practiced.)

Mark Twain has been quoted as saying: “It usually takes me at least three weeks to prepare a good impromptu speech.”

3. And Now for the Presentation

The most important thing to remember is to be yourself, (unless you’re a disorganized, disheveled mess – and then try to be someone else for the moment). Dress the part, maintain good eye contact with the audience, exude confidence and, laugh at your own mistakes.

You will have people with different learning patterns including visual, auditory and kinesthetic. Try to include all 3 into your talk.

The number one element is the visual – add some slides or images along with the talk. This is a great way to illustrate what you’re saying and most people will make the connections you are aiming at a lot faster with pictures.

Another important element is the auditory, both in what you say and how you say it. Practice your talk using “punctuation” by varying the speed, tone and volume of your voice.

But, don’t forget that what people are there for is the information you are about to provide. Again pick your topic and make yourself both knowledgeable and entertaining if you want to position yourself as an expert. Audiences will forgive the odd mistakes, but the impression will not be good if you come across as boring – nobody want to have their time wasted.

4. Crafting your Talk

This is really a basic concept, but sometimes reflexologists forget to start with the end in mind. What do you want the audience to walk away with? Be it a history lesson, a few easy to do techniques, or excitement about an offer you’d like to make – keep that in mind from the beginning.

Talks have a standard beginning, middle and end. Plan, prepare and then practice.

And, don’t forget to focus on the popular “radio station WIIFM”. Those letters stand for “what’s in it for me”. Remember it’s not all about you… it’s all about them, your audience.

5. Be Physical

On the physical aspect there are two main points I’d like to make. One is to prep like you’re training for the Olympics. If that sounds too dramatic, then just start the week before and take care of yourself. You’ve got it… get plenty of sleep… eat right… do some stress relieving exercises… (and/or meditate) so you have good physical and mental energy. It really does count.

The other hand when you’re giving your talk, remember to move a little, or even a lot. Use your hands (but don’t flail them about wildly). Walk towards your audience, or from stage left to stage right (and vice versa). If you’re presenting slides or powerpoint, remember to face the audience and not just the screen.

6. Practice, Practice, Practice!

Give your talk to friends and family. Give your talk in front of the mirror or to your cat. The more times you give it the easier and more relaxed you are likely to be. Joining a group like “Toastmasters International” or any public speaking organization will help. You might consider investing in a speaking coach to help you lose the ums… and ahhs…

7. Close with a Mission

After telling the personal stories, the humorous quips and fascinating facts, you might as well tell the audience what to do next. Too many speakers fail to do this one last and important step. Let your listeners know the next step, i.e., read this book… sign up for this workshop… see me after for questions or to schedule an appointment.

If you don’t give them this part, well you’ve served the apple pie without the cheese or the kiss without the squeeze.

Have fun and start planning.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology for the Senses

July 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

4 STEPS TO THE MOST POWERFUL RELAXATION REMINDERS I CREATE FOR MY CLIENTS…AND FOR MYSELF

As Reflexologists we have powerful Reflexology “tools” at our disposal that offer our clients deep relaxation and relief from stress. And what happens to our bodies when we’re relaxed and DE-stressed. We feel better. Our bodies can return to balance faster. Our healing processes are supported.

Is that enough? It’s a lot already. But what if you had an opportunity to offer even greater relaxation, with minimum effort. That’s right almost nothing more for you to do in the session work.

Easy, you think. Well, you’re right. Here are “the 4 most powerful relaxation reminders I create for my clients…and for myself.”

  1. Consider THE VISUAL – You want the surroundings for your clients and for you to be relaxing, calm and peaceful. In my office I have lots of fabrics, calming images, sculpture and curtains (which hide some of my storage, for me a necessity, for my clients it eliminates any visual clutter). You can work in an office, your home or a rented space but keep the area of your work visually calm and soothing. How can you do this at home or if you share a rental space? An inexpensive solution is to use screens and curtains to separate living and working areas in your home. In a rental space, bring some fabrics and pin or drape them to set the tone and offset that office feeling. A silk fabric or a beautiful floral banner can fit nice and lightly into any Reflexology travel kit. This creates a memory or reminder for relaxation. 
  2. Consider THE AUDITORY – Have a pleasant sounding environment. This too can create a memory or reminder for relaxation. Try a cascading fountain or a sound machine that produces gentle nature sounds. Music-only tapes and CD’s that have soothing melodies are great. Remember it’s best if there are no words to the music. Why no words? People naturally go into their heads when they hear words. Some songs might have sad memories attached, which is another reason why “neutral” works best. And…REMEMBER that for people who work in the music business, any music might put them in work mode. Often they’ll request silence. Sound can be powerfully relaxing or a stress trigger. Bottom line – offer the option and let the client choose. 
  3. Consider THE TACTILE – This is what we do. We create a relaxing touch experience for our clients. It’s touch that’s safe, compassionate and therapeutic. The tactile can also be represented in color and the textures of our table linens: sheets and coverings. Again, this creates a memory or reminder for relaxation 
  4. Consider THE AROMATIC – First, choose whether to work with aromas or not. If your space has any kind of odd or musty smell then the choice has already been made for you! If you can’t move, AROMA INVIGORATE! Did you know that several common essential oils are anti-viral, anti-septic, anti-fungal AND anti-biotic. Remember that around cold season! And did you know there’s no standard to the essential oil industry? All essential oil products differ. Some of the “best” blends can have other oils added (still pure and natural, but you’re paying a lot for common vegetable and nut oil extenders). You need to research and trust your distributor. For those who choose Aromatherapy, you’re session space should have a pleasant supportive aroma. You can change the mood of the session, i.e. uplifting, calming, healing, etc. … with your choice of pure essential oils. The mere whiff of the pure and natural essential oils that I use, “evokes a little bit of Wendy Heaven”, as one of my clients described it.

Several clients, whenever they enter my office, say they immediately feel relaxed. That’s before I’ve done anything!

Remember my reference to Pavlov? Well, my clients senses are reminding them of the previous sessions and how relaxing and good they felt.

I choose to work with these powerful healing tools because of their versatility in my sessions.

My clients draw real benefits from this. They can also be reminded and brought back into relaxation at any point afterward, just by carrying an oil previously used in the Reflexology session.

It’s true that some clients will request “no aroma” at all. In this case, it’s easy to keep your space neutral since aromas diffuse quickly. Only a very, very few clients won’t be able to tolerate any aroma. And in fact, I don’t have any such clients.

I LOVE working with AROMATHERAPY.

I carry 2-3 essential oils with me at all times. They’re in small bottles and they’re life savers.

Where have they saved me most often? On airplanes, on the streets of New York City and in taxis and subways. I know it’s so pedestrian (no pun) but more than once, I’ve reached for an oil and saved my nose and sanity!

Want to learn more? Everything you need to know is in my Aromatherapy Workshop and my Gemstone Therapy Workshop. They starts next month!

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills!

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Sports Reflexology

June 29, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

Reflexology and Golf

Summertime, and the living is easy… I love that song. Along with summer comes all of the summer sports and golf is one of the most popular sports in the world. It is estimated that between 28 million to 35 million play golf worldwide.

In addition to the huge number of golfers, the standard of the game and the players has also gone up. It’s turned from being a leisurely afternoon game to high intensity competition. And, like any other sport, even golfers need to maintain their health and stamina – as they say, “a golf game starts from the ground up”. It’s especially important for a golfer to plant their feet firmly on the ground.

Stress and tensions that are held in the body can affect the quality of the game they play. It can lead to strains and injuries. An overdose of the game might be another reason that can lead to wear and tear on the body which can then further lead to unwanted injuries.

For a long time now, I’ve thought that opening a reflexology chair site at a busy golf course is a great way to introduce the health benefits of reflexology and also tap into a niche market for the summer season (here in Florida it’s year-round.

It’s so easy and much less hassle than other modalities because all the golfer has to do is to take off their shoes (and you can offer that service as an added, pampering bonus). Not to mention that golfers can be almost fanatical about their game and most will do anything and pay anything to improve their game.

Everyone knows that proper warm-ups and workouts are needed to maintain the body in good shape and prevent injuries. But golfers are not necessarily the most dedicated group for pre and post sport exercise. Reflexology is definitely an option which helps to fight back on injuries and strains. It’s been proved that reflexology helps to relax the body which can also increase flexibility and help to prevent further probable injury.

Here are some of the reflex sites that I commonly address for maintenance on possible strains and injuries common to golfers:

  • The area around the neck gets sore; this can be due to excessive force in hitting the ball. Paying attention to the 7 cervical vertebrae reflexes and the foot reflex for the trapezius is specifically helpful here.
  • Hands, forearms are another area prone to injury due to gripping and swinging of club all of which is very manageable with Hand Reflexology.
  • Elbows are the next area highly prone to injury due to the swinging of the club. You’ve heard of tennis elbow, well, if the pain is on the other side of the elbow, it’s referred to as “golfers elbow“. Any issue with a name like that… need I say more? And, yes we have an elbow reflex to work at the bases of the fifth metatarsals and metacarpals. Now is it’s time to shine!
  • For the lower body, which is susceptible due to the playing stance, reflexology can help to rejuvenate the entire body with special attention paid to the lower thoracic and lumbar vertebrae reflex area. In addition, the reflexes of the legs, hops and knees can be addressed.

So, if you want to add some extra income (and even learn a few pointers about the game) check out your local golf club and start swinging.


Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

One Reflexology Question Not to Miss

June 27, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

As reflexologists, we all keep records of our clients contact information and health history, including what their chief complaints are.

It’s a standard in the field and if you’re nationally ARCB certified, you already have what I think is the best client intake form ever. For those of you who aren’t (why wouldn’t you be?) there are client health history forms in many books.

Some intake forms are long and some are short, but there’s one very important question that I hope you are asking.

On the surface this question might not seem as important as many of the others. Don’t be fooled by how simple it is. Early in my career, I wasn’t sure how important it was but I quickly learned its value, and now I never start without it:

“How would you rate your present state of health? (circle one) Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor.”

That’s it. Almost…

It’s not enough to stop there because after getting the answer, I then need to ask one more question.

After looking at the client’s answer, my next question is… “and what would it take for you to say _____”?

For example, if they reported an answer of “Good”, next I’ll say “and what would it take for you to say – Excellent”?

If they reported Fair, I’ll say “and what would it take for you to say, Good… or Excellent”?

If they reported Poor, I’ll say “and what would it take for you to say, Fair… Good… or Excellent”?

The only time I don’t use this second question is if they say they already rate their current health as “Excellent”. There’s always room for improvement, but I usually take an “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” attitude here.

Okay, getting back to the second question… are you seeing a pattern here?

Why would I want to know what it would take for some improvement to occur? Haven’t I already gotten information about past and recent illness, injury, etc.

Yes indeed. And I will definitely work to help the organ system reflexes, but this particular question is more about quality of life. It points to health goals and personal goals like no other question can.

Let me give you an example: “Client 1” reports that they would rate their present state of health as “Good”. (Remember, I already have the health history, so it’s great information in addition to all the rest.)

I’ll ask: “and what would it take for you to say… Excellent”?

They might report that they are trying to lose some weight, or report that they would like to exercise more, or have some time for themselves.

That’s when I become a “cheer-leader” for these quality of life goals.

Once I have this information I can align with supporting them in this aspect of their journey as well.

I’ll have suggestions or referrals to make. It might be simple ideas about exercise or diet, or I might know someone who I can refer them to for more expert advice.

Sometimes just talking about these goals will start the wheels turning in their head as well as mine… and sometimes not. I never force the conversation and I will ask for their permission before I make my suggestions. That way I’ll stay within their expectations for a reflexology session and my scope of practice.

This is always a great component to the session, so don’t lose out on this additional supportive opportunity.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology & Restless Leg Syndrome

June 18, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

Here’s a report from one of my students on her experience with Restless Leg Syndrome and her Dad.

“My most interesting experience I’ve had as a reflexology student are sessions with an elderly client, my father, age 76. He has many health issues but is no feeble senior.

He’s built like an ox and continues to have a lot of energy. Nevertheless, he needs many medications to keep him healthy.

The health problems he faces are high blood pressure, history of 2 heart attacks, remission of prostate cancer, urinary tract infections and incontinence. [ ] He is overweight and doesn’t sleep well as he stops breathing during sleep and has restless leg syndrome.

Reflexology, being a gentle form of accessing the body’s own healing abilities, gives me a way I can help my dad to feel better and help his body create a healing response.

The sessions we’ve had together follow a pattern. I start the session using relaxation techniques and within 5-10 minutes, he is dozing off.

During the session, his legs draw toward his chest, somewhat like he is riding a bike. I keep a hold of his foot at whatever spot I am at while his foot dorsiflexes away from me.

At this point, I use deep pressure at the solar plexus reflex and gradually the foot and leg release and return to resting position. I like to think of this a reflexology dance we go through!

It’s truly amazing to see how powerful the solar plexus reflex is in this case. No other reflex points seem to help as fast to calm the foot and leg.

While this is going on, my dad also “holds” his breath and then lets it out with a “poof” when the leg and foot relax. Because of this, I always detail his diaphragm and heart reflexes as they are working so hard.

The first session with my dad, I was a bit uncomfortable with the feet pulling away, as I wondered if this meant his body didn’t like reflexology.

Using the universal relaxing reflex point of the solar plexus makes all the difference, so I know I’m just helping his body to process the tissues and fluids being moved.

I now enjoy the sessions and look forward to them, knowing my dad sleeps more soundly after these.

He usually takes a nap after, and was not aware of his leg movements during the sessions.

I hope continuous sessions will help improve his ability to breathe easier and sleep deeper.

– Elaine T.

Wendy’s note:

Restless leg syndrome or RLS, is a neurological disorder that effects approximately 5 million adults and up to 1 million children in the US alone.

The hallmark of this syndrome is, as the name says, restlessness in the legs and sometimes described as a tingling sensation, or “irritability” of the legs along with an urge to move them.

These sensations usually come when the legs are at rest, so they can interrupt sleep or efforts to rest and relax.

Whether the RLS is constant or intermittent, temporary relief can come almost immediately when the legs are moved and are active.

With no specific known cause and affecting young and old, RLS often worsens with age. Some causes of RLS are thought to be symptoms related to diabetes, pregnancy and sometimes it’s also associated with anemia.

Be careful as a reflexologist that you are not diagnosing this or any other disease. If a client tells me that they have RLS, I ask them who diagnosed it. The source should be a qualified medical professional and not a neighbor or their uncle Bob!

Restless Leg Syndrome is different from Periodic Limb Movement. Although they share some similarities they are in fact separate conditions.

In addition to the reflexes that Elaine mentioned above, I would also include the following into my protocol:

The CNS Reflexes, including the Solar Plexus and Sciatic Nerve Reflexes

The Musculo-Skeletal System Reflexes, including the Diaphragm, Lumbar Spine, Sacrum, Pelvis and Leg, Hip & Knee Reflexes.

The Immune System Reflexes, including the Spleen Reflex (support for anemia).

– And any other reflexes that may be contributing, i.e., if there is diabetes (and it’s controlled), I’ll also include the reflex to the pancreas, etc.

Reflexology tends to work especially well with chronic conditions so it’s always worth trying. Keep good notes and share your experiences.
Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology & Yorick

June 18, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

Hamlet: “Alas, poor Yorick! …he hath borne me on his back a thousand times.”

Yorick’s skull: “If you ask me, I’m still carrying the whole scene!”

— Christopher Reeve as Hamlet, on The Muppet Show

It’s hard for me to believe that even today, there are people who can’t tell the difference between reflexology and massage.

Now there’s nothing wrong with massage and a good foot massage can be wonderful. It’s a personal preference and personally, I’ll keep looking until I find an actual reflexologist.

When I went to massage school I knew, as soon as my neck sent shooting tingles and numbness down my right arm, that at my age I was not going to last long in such a labor-intensive field.

(In a recent job analysis it was found that the average age of a reflexologist is 51 and she already has a college education. While researching massage, I found that on average a massage therapist is no longer working in the field after about 2 years, in part because of the strain on the body.)

But because of my training, I can now say with some authority that reflexology has little or nothing to do with massage and here, quite simply, is the reason why.

The focus of massage is the soft tissue of the body. When giving a massage, the focus is predominantly on the muscles, tendons, ligaments, attachments, connective tissue, etc.

Sure, when giving a massage you consider the whole body, but I guarantee that when a massage therapist is working on the gastrocnemius their focus is on the leg, the back, and not on a specific organ – like the kidneys, the colon or any other organ in the body.

But, when I work with reflexology, my focus is almost entirely aimed towards the organ systems of the body. I care less about the foot – it’s muscles and attachments – than I do about the kidneys, the liver, the large and small intestines, the heart or the thyroid, to name a few. And, although I’m not treating these organs, as a reflexologist my goal is to “energetically” support their function.

The focus of massage is on the muscles. The focus of reflexology is on the organs. Period.

If we take a look at the history of reflexology, it’s closest parallel is more likely to be with chiropractics than with massage.

Now this, I can understand. (And, no – there is no bone crunching with reflexology… ever!)

The premise of chiropractics is that the alignment of the spine has an impact on all of the organs on the body. Therefore good spine alignment is necessary for optimum health and poor alignment can impact the organs in a negative way.

Of course spinal alignment can be an aggressive procedure and in the mid 1900’s there were several well-publicized cases where people died from chiropractics.

I believe this was one of the reasons that, as recently as the 1960’s, chiropractics was outlawed (as in not legal to practice) in many states – including New York!

Another reason proved to be what I call “turf wars” between chiropractors and allopathic medicine.

They had to fight for many years and their case went through several court systems until eventually a U. S. District Court Judge decided that the American Medical Association “had engaged in a lengthy, systematic, successful and unlawful boycott, designed to eliminate the profession of chiropractic as a competitor.”

But now, instead of being called “an unscientific cult” and “the chiropractic menace”, you can become a Doctor of Chiropractics.

As for the science and medicine behind chiropractics, they have a similar anecdotal history with no absolute scientific proof, just like reflexology.

I’ve never heard of reflexology causing death but maybe in the early days, while our histories were more parallel, if it had…. we’d all be “Doctors of Reflexology” too.

I’m truly glad that our gentle, non-invasive techniques have never been proven to harm anyone… but please, don’t tell me that reflexology is massage either.

chirobase.org/05RB/BCC/postscript.html

chiroeco.com/news/chiropractic-news.php?id=2685

wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_chiropractic

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.comand join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

15 Tips for Career Longevity

June 1, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

After practicing reflexology for 20 years, I’ve noticed a few things that work and a some that don’t. Today I’ve compiled a list of the most important things to do for career longevity.

I call it my “Reflexology Career Longevity Ergonomic Check List”. Take a look and see where you stand (or sit):

  1.  Are you sitting comfortably in your chair? Sounds simple, but I find a lot of students are so focused on their work that they loose track of good posture.
  2. Are you sitting half way between the front and back of the chair seat? This position will give you the maximum amount of room to turn or pivot in your chair.
  3. If you have a sore back or existing back condition, have you supported your back appropriately? This is the exception to the item above because you must support your back if that’s what it needs. Don’t forget that twisting your back is not an option and a chair with wheels may be necessary.
  4. Do you have your feet planted firmly on the floor? Hello. Put both feet on the floor for the best ergonomics and grounding. If you need a small stool, have one nearby.
  5. Is the table at a comfortable height? Is it approximately at elbow height? Table height will be different for everyone but in general don’t have your hands too high or too low when you’re working.
  6. Are your shoulders relaxed when doing the work? If they start to hurt, holding tension your shoulders while working is likely the culprit – pay attention to this especially if you have a previous injury.
  7. Are your wrists and hands aligned and in a comfortable “relaxed and straight” position? Remember to change hand direction and not use your dominant hand for all the work. Keeping wrists relaxed and relatively straight will minimize strain.
  8. Is there room at the end of the table for your arms to be supported? I like my clients feet on the table so I can rest my arms while working. If you like the feet off the table, well, I don’t know how you keep your arms up for 6 or 7 hours a day… if they do get tired, I invite you to try my method.
  9. Do you hold the foot with a loose, relaxed hand? When practitioners are just starting out there is a lot to pay attention to – okay, there is always a lot to pay attention to – and I’ve observed some students use a hold that I call “the death grip”. They are hanging on for dear life. Lighten up, especially while doing the relaxation techniques.
  10. Do you use a moderate touch while thumb-walking? There is a range of techniques and pressures and you need to know how to do them all because there is a time and a place for everything. However, there are many reflexologists who do just fine with the lightest of touch and others who have the physical strength and the inclination to go deep and stay there. Both of these styles and all those in between work, so use the pressure that will give you in the best ergonomics.
  11. Do you change postures regularly? Movement is so important. The more you can move the less apt you’ll be to stay in a position that’s not working for you.
  12. Do you take a break and stretch between sessions or at least once every hour? Those of you who do yoga know that when you do a twist or a stretch, you do a counter twist or stretch soon after. Because we often reach forward with our arms, a counter stretch and shaking out the arms makes sense too.
  13. Do you occasionally stand to work? I love to stand at various points during a session to get a better position for working and it reminds me to stay loose.
  14. Do you vary your thumb-walking to suit the angle or surface texture of the foot? Change directions and/or change hands so you can get deeper into the tissue from a different angle. This is not about pressure it’s about connecting with the reflexes.
  15. Do you insert relaxation techniques within the session for variety and ergonomic relief? I do this all the time. I call them desserts and before or after I detail an area, or if the client has felt some sensitivity, I reward them (and me) with a yummy relaxation technique.

I know you’re doing most of these things, but if you find even one item on this list that could be improved… well, my work here is done.

It pays to take care of yourself and your ergonomics. The reward can be a long and prosperous career.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills. Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

 

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training “THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

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