Reflexology and Morton’s Neuroma

March 7, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

After several weeks of discomfort involving a “burning/poking of a needle sensation” and “walking on marbles” feeling, my mother was diagnosed with Morton’s neuroma – an enlarged nerve between the 3rd and 4th metatarsals that’s become entangled enough to resemble a tumor.

The condition targets athletes mostly, but can also come from wearing high heels – – my mother does/did neither.

The podiatrist fitted her with an orthotic – basically a glorified metatarsal pad – which she was told to wear for a month before she felt relief.

Relief never came.

A shot was next. Again, no relief ever came.

Upon doing research for a more holistic approach to treating this seemingly unresolved condition, I came across an anti-inflammatory enzyme which yielded amazing results for other Morton neuroma sufferers: serrapeptase.

After checking with her pharmacist and primary care doctor, my mother began a dosage of one pill every morning. Having already been a patient of acupuncture, she went two times a week for three weeks then down to one time a week thereafter with the focus being on the neuroma.

In conjunction with these approaches, a weekly reflexology session began. The following maps out the protocol used:

Week 1:

Regular session, avoiding any pressure other than a gentle touch on the neuroma and any warm up techniques involving the metatarsal heads on affected foot. Emphasis on the spinal and sciatic reflexes.

Week 2:

Regular session with emphasis again on spinal and sciatic reflexes. This week applied a moderate pressure by a thumb walk around the neuroma, not directly on it.

Week 3:

Repeat of previous weeks on session. Moderate pressure by thumb walking around the neuroma. Moderate pressure on neuroma, with circular motion with light pressure.

Week 4:

Repeat of preview weeks on session with emphasis more on neuroma since more pressure can be had without much pain from client.

Thumb walked entire neuroma with vertical and lateral thumb walks. Thumb walk around the neuroma, then thumb walk diagonal and horizontal towards the lateral aspect of the foot.

Moderate pressure with a hook and back-up for several repeats, depending on pain tolerance. Finished with gentle circular motion and a thumb slide towards the lateral aspect of the foot.

Week 5 – Forward:

Regular session with more emphasis on the neuroma. Neuroma sequence as follows:

  • Thumb walk neuroma with upward and medial and lateral side walks
  • Rotation on the neuroma point (the very center of the neuroma) with pressure tolerable to a 3. Pause on point for a count of ten. Rotate on point for a count of ten. Repeat five times
  • Butterfly around neuroma (thumb walk with both thumbs walking on point alternatively – – fluttering effect)
  • Butterfly on neuroma in a lateral and vertical fashion with as firm pressure as tolerable
  • Thumb slides towards heads of metatarsals
  • Thumb slides towards lateral aspect of foot
  • Thumb walk neuroma
  • Medium to firm pressure on neuroma point for count of ten
  • Inversion – Eversion

Each week past the fifth week, the pressure used was more firm and became increasingly more tolerable by the client. The neuroma size began to shrink and may have moved to the fourth metatarsal, bordering the fifth (the possible effect of thumb sliding towards the lateral aspect of the foot).

Along with the daily wear of an orthotic shoe, my mother’s holistic approach of the reflexology as sequenced above, the daily dosage serraptese, and acupuncture began around November 20, 2011 and had the following results:

*By December 10, the burning sensation common with Morton’s Neuroma had subsided greatly, along with the feeling of walking on marbles. My mother, who had previously been unable to walk a mere two blocks to the supermarket, was at this point able to walk and do some grocery shopping.

*By January 1, 2012 she was able to take the train into Manhattan and walk around with very little pain at the end of the day in her foot.

*By January 29, I felt the neuroma “moving its’ way out” between the 3rd and 4th metarsals and felt smaller in size.

*On February 23, after a check-up with her podiatrist she was prescribed to “keep doing what you’re doing” – though he equated her healing with the orthotics and suggested she be the poster child for them. Ha!

– Elizabeth B.

Professor’s note: Thanks for sharing this with all!

© Wendy Coad

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Flat Foot Boogie

February 22, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

Dear Wendy,

When and if you get a moment could you say something to me about fallen arches (…the left one).

… discovered it was the author of that whole on-going adventure in December with my.. knee. Is there hope?

– Barry

Hi Barry,

Glad to hear that the mystery is solved, sorry about your foot though.

I knew someone with flat feet who got his arches back through exercise. As I recall the exercise centered around toning the “tibialis anterior” (toe raises) and lengthening the “peroneous longus” (rolling onto the outside of your feet).

There’s a lot implicated in fallen arches. Bones cannot stay in or out of place without the help of the ligaments, tendons and muscles that surround them.

Ligaments, once overstretched don’t often go back to their original length, tendons maybe a little bit, but muscles have a lot of potential because of their elasticity.

I think that’s your best bet – exercises and also check for trigger points in the “peroneus longus” which is along the outside (lateral side) of your calf.

He did say that this was a daily exercise an that his arch stayed intact throughout the day, but if he had a particularly long day on his feet that his arches would again be flat by the time he got home in the evening. He did swear by this technique though.

If you don’t already have Clair Davies book “The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook” – time to get it, along with a tennis ball.

Also, if the [person] that helped you discover this problem is a physical therapist or kinesiologist, get them to help you with the whole picture. You can see that there might be other issues further up the system.

In my opinion, there’s definitely some work that can be done here to reduce the effects.

Best,

Wendy

I didn’t go into detail in my response, but the “peroneus longus” and the “tibialis anterior” both attach to the base of the 1st metatarsal and come from different directions.

They come together they form a “stirrup” on the plantar arch that helps support the integrety of it’s structure.

As my reflexology client, of course I’d be mostly curious about his digestive system and if there have been any change in patterns there.

© Wendy Coad

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Airplane Reflexology

February 6, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

Here’s my favorite ”5-Step Airplane Reflexology Sequence”. I use it and it helps every time:

1. First, get a glass or bottle of water from the stewardess and settle in. Dehydration is one of the main factors contributing to airplane discomfort and jet lag! My favorite seats on an airplane are the aisles because I continually drink liquids (especially important on long flights).

2. Carry a small bottle of lotion (less than 3 ounces so I can take it through security). Take out the lotion and apply a small amount to the hands as part of the “warm-ups”. I work the lotion onto the dorsum, up the forearm, between the fingers and into the webs. This alone will get the blood flowing.

3. Next, work the fingers with alternating thumb and finger walking – like a pinching motion on either side of the digit. I prefer working from tip to base, again to support the “venous” return. I detail the area around the nails and finger tips.

4. Starting on the palm, thumb-walk in any direction – the one that has the most ease. I’ll definitely work more on the reflexes to the immune system; spleen, thymus and lymph (both axillary and groin) reflexes.

5. Last but not least, the dorsum. I work with a one finger-walk technique around the knuckles and then combine several fingers to “walk” the last few passes across the metacarpals an up the wrist.

Finish it up with a cradling of each finger in the opposite palm. This technique is used as a calming sequence for all the digits. To end, I hold the solar plexus points.

In the past, I’ve written about giving a woman, who was sitting next to me on a plane having a debilitating PMS attack, a soothing hand reflexology session. (You can go to my reflexology blog www.ReflexologySuccess.com to find the article and others that are archived there.)

I must confess that I’ve even given myself a foot reflexology session (working through my socks) while flying the friendly skies. Not to be done by the very shy – it did generate some lively interest from my fellow passengers. One person said that they’d become a client if they lived closer to me and all the stewardesses swooned each time they passed by.

(I too became the client of reflexologist who was giving someone foot reflexology in the public mineral-water pool at a national park. Talk about a great way to demonstrate your skills, I booked a session with her on the spot and go back regularly when I’m in the area.)

Once the plane reaches its cruising speed and the computers come out, I often look around at the business people with their laptops open, crunching the numbers as the plane soars.

I think about how lucky I am to be a reflexologist. I too am conducting business analysis, but mine is such a pleasure and so good for my health. In addition I carry all the tools I need with me where ever I go. There’s really nothing better.

© Wendy Coad

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR E-ZINE OR WEBSITE?

You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it:
Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

The Headache of Hammertoe

January 24, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

Hammertoe is the most common term for bent toes (mallet toe and claw toe, are differentiated by the joints that are contracted). Although they may be caused by injury, muscle imbalance or birth defect, they are most commonly formed by ill fitting shoes (too pointy, too short, too narrow or too tight).

Lots of people ask if Reflexology can do anything to help Hammertoes. Remember, as Reflexologists we don’t treat, diagnose or prescribe. Having said that, I always respond to any such inquiry…YES, absolutely!

Why would I be so bold? Because I firmly believe that Reflexology can help just about anything.. Remember that Reflexology is never a substitute for medical treatment. If there is a medical problem they should go for medical help.

For my clients, I integrate all my great relaxation techniques for the toes and detail them in my session sequence. I might be curious whether they experience headaches or sinus congestion too!

Here’s what else I do. I have my client stand on a piece of paper. Have them hold onto a chair so they’re stable and have them put their full walking weight on one foot.

Then I draw the outline of that foot with a pen held at 90 degrees from the paper. Once the outline of each foot is on the paper, I’ll put one of their shoes over the paper and align it with the foot.

Usually you can see that the foot is larger than the shoe, especially at the toes.

Next, I send them to a good shoe store and tell them to take the paper with them.

The store will fit them to shoes that are a bit wider and half and inch longer than their foot. They should be snug and the heel will be low.

Try it. Your feet will thank you for years to come.

I hope you’ve enjoyed your Reflexology newsletter… tell all your friends so they can benefit from it too.

© Wendy Coad

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR E-ZINE OR WEBSITE?

You can, as long as you include this complete blurb with it:
Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

The Reflexology Two-Step

January 9, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

I’m often asked this question in class, “which foot is it best to start a reflexology session on?” I love this question because it means that the student is thinking about a strategy.

I have my preference and I’m sure that you have yours. But why? Is it better to start on the left foot or start on the right?

Right away, I can tell you that the reflexologists who work both feet alternately do not have this dilemma. They do a bit of work on one foot and then they quickly move to the next, and back and forth they go. They may still have a plan for where to begin, but it won’t hold the same import as those of us who work the first foot entirely before going on to the next.

Did I hear an audible gasp? As a profession, reflexologists tend to be attached to their reflexology protocols. To many, the way they learned is the only way it’s done. Okay, if it “ain’t broke”, don’t fix it.

It would be easy to say that I start on one foot because that’s how I was taught. And, that it’s worked for me and countless others. Thousands and thousands in fact because my instructor taught for many years, I’ve been teaching for almost 20 years and many of my teacher trainees are now teaching my method.

But really, I think that the best explanation for choosing the starter foot is, preference.

Let’s look at the options – there are only two.

Starting with the right foot (as many do), since most of us are “righties” (meaning right-handed), it’s this side of the body that often holds the most tension. So, why not start of the side that may need the most attention? Good plan.

In Indian and Asian healing practices, the right-side of the body represents the yang energies, the masculine, the outward reaching, the upward moving.

And, the left side of the body represents the denser yin energy, the feminine, the inward and downward moving.

Now, I know I might be comparing apples and oranges here because these concepts are found in the eastern philosophies of both Ayurvedic and Oriental healing modalities and are not inherent in reflexology.

But, I’ve studied both Ayurveda (via Polarity Therapy) and Oriental Medicine (via Acupressure and Shiatsu) and they have definitely influenced my practice. So, when giving a reflexology session, I usually do start with the left foot, the “inward moving” or “receiving” side.

Do I always start on the left? No, not always. There are clients who have so much going on on the right side of their body that I will begin the session on the corresponding foot because I feel that the work is needed there the most.

The beauty of reflexology is – it’s not brain surgery. The body gets what the body needs. Unlike Ayurveda and Oriental medicine, where direction, and calculations rule most everything, in reflexology there is no absolute right or wrong direction, no right or wrong foot, no right or wrong protocol.

I’m not saying that how you work doesn’t ever matter. I’m saying that changing the order won’t hurt, negate or compromise to the point of negligence, the reflexology session. The one thing that I’ve learned through studying thousands of hours of different bodywork techniques is that reflexology is uniquely different. It simply and exquisitely taps into the body’s inherent wisdom so that the body can use the support it receives from reflexology to heal itself naturally.

My best advice is to say: follow your instincts. The body will get from reflexology what the body needs. I trust that above all else because that’s what I’ve observed over and over again with countless clients, students and even myself.

So pick a foot and get started.

Happy New Year from the Reflexology Professor!


Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

How Steve Cured His Foot Pain

December 31, 2011 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

Steve comes to my classes to teach part of the Anatomy and Physiology. As a psycho-pharmacologist (he helps people with emotional disturbances and when appropriate, to use medication wisely), he has a great knowledge of the body and, obviously, the brain. He’ll be the first one to tell you that reflexology affects the parasympathetic nervous system.  And, he “works for reflexology” because every time he teaches, as payment, he’ll get a session from one of the students during our practice sessions. (This is a real hands-on class – we practice our techniques every day.)

So, when he had foot pain, I wanted to pay him back for all the support he’s given me. I gave him a soothing foot reflexology session before he went to bed. (I was also thinking about the late night project I might do with all the great energy I’d be generating for myself.)

Now, as a reflexologist, my first thoughts were not about Steve’s feet! As I worked, I asked him to tell me what areas, if any, were tender. I also noticed the areas where there was a change in the tissue texture.I won’t give away all his secrets, but you can be sure there was a connection between the areas of tenderness and health/diet issues.The feet are such gossips, they will tell you everything.

So, I asked a few questions relating to the spine and the organs in the abdominal cavity. It’s not about being a genius, it’s just about asking useful questions (something else you learn in class).

I would never tell anyone that there’s something wrong. They would have to see a medical practitioner for that. (Reflexologists never diagnose, treat or prescribe!)

We can be intelligent though and once issues are confirmed, our conversation centered around which diet/lifestyle, etc., changes could best help.

As a reflexologist, my main interest is in the body, the organs and organ systems. But, I know there’s still a foot (or two) involved.
I wanted to help there too.

So I asked Steve what he already knew to do… “tell me something that’s helped you in the past” (commonly, this isn’t the first time a problem appears in the area).
Since we’d covered this territory before, Steve knew that soaking his feet in alternating warm/hot and cool/cold water helps a lot. He also knew that specific, light exercise (the ones we learned in class) and working some very tight muscles on his leg helped too. Asking the question reminded him of that.
Although he was told by a podiatrist that he had a heel spur and it would need cortizone shots,  he opted for my reflexology and his own hot and cold hydro-therapy techniques.

After a short while, his pain was almost completely gone. That was several years ago now and it has never come back.
My work with my favorite client may never be done (and, I hope not). But, there’s nothing more satisfying to a reflexologist (and a wife) than knowing that I can help.
And, he’s taking responsibility for his own body – he knows where to go for help, and… how to help himself.
I wish the same for all.
Happy Holidays.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

“Cranial” Reflexology

December 2, 2011 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

One of the first things I learn when I studied Cranio-sacral Balancing is that the body has a symphony of rhythms, each in concert with the other.

There’s a very special rhythm created by the movement of the cerebral-spinal fluid, which baths our brain and spine like a tide that washes up and down it’s length.

And, there’s a pulse that is palpable which follows the flow of this tide. The rate of this rhythm is approximately seven beats per minute.

So, in addition to our heart rhythm and the rhythm of our breathing, our whole skeletal system gently pulses – inverts and everts – to the flow of the cranial-spinal fluid.

It took me some time to learn how to palpate the cranial rhythm since it’s so deep within our body. It’s with the utmost respect and the deepest “listening“ through my fingertips that I finally sensed the magic of it’s movement.

As if that weren’t awesome enough, I learned that with the gentlest of techniques this primal motion could be safely paused, as if to set it to rest for a few seconds and up to several minutes.

It’s known as inducing the “still point.”

Once the cranial rhythm is put into a pause the body can rest in a natural way, freed momentarily from one more task, albeit a natural one.

This is where the deepest relaxation effect is to be had – like a mega alpha state where consciousness is well beneath the surface, but not to the point yet of unconsciousness.

We’ve all experienced it when we receive reflexology and our clients have too – that’s why we love our work so much, the relaxation effect of this state is profound.

An experienced crainio-sacral practitioner is very familiar with the still point and how to induce it. Once set into place, the practitioner need do nothing more than wait for the body to reset itself.

And the body will naturally resume its cranial rhythms, so slight and gentle that they are almost imperceptible even to the trained.

Along with this reset is the potential for irregularities in the natural movement to be corrected and be brought back into greater alignment.

So what does this have to do with reflexology and our solar plexus points?

When we hold these simple reflex points, we can naturally induce this state of deep relaxation – the “still point”.

By changing nothing that you already do, just be aware that your thumbs placed in the solar plexus center of both feet, with a hold that is both gentle and firm, will likely do what Cranio-sacral Balancing practitioners strive to do to help their clients.

It’s a good thing for body and soul.

Ever wonder why, at the end of your session when you hold these points, there’s yet another wave of relaxation that comes over your client?

Well, now you know and by doing nothing else, you’ve supplied a magical addition to your session.

And, that’s another reason why I begin and end every session with the solar plexus reflex.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology vs Nerve Reflexes – The Achilles Tendon

November 6, 2011 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

Yes, there are points on the Achilles tendon that reflex to the body (I’ve heard it called the “hemorrhoid line”), but it doesn’t seem like the proportions are right… big strong tendon, small energy connection.

The Achilles tendon is the strongest and the toughest tendon in the body. It connects the muscles of the calf to the heel. It’s also known as the Tendon Calcaneus.

If it’s an issue for my clients, it’s often because the tendon is prone to injury due to excessive use in sports that involve a lot of running and jumping.

The injuries can be mild, like inflammation, but if not properly cared for might cause more adverse conditions.

Any inflammation, swelling or any other kind of irritation and discomfort in the Achilles tendon is known as Achilles tendonitis. Achilles tendonitis could lead to small tears within the tendon and eventually lead to rupture!

Injuries to this tendon can be caused by general weakness and congestion. Other possible causes are:

  • Overuse leads to excessive wear and tear of the muscle leading to injury (by far the major cause of Achilles tendonitis).
  • incorrect footwear
  •  improper running technique
  • Some kind of trauma and infection might also lead to it
  • Arthritis is another cause for problems in the Achilles tendon.

As a Reflexologist, I can’t diagnose or treat any illness but I do know that reflexology, as a complement to doctor recommended pain management (i.e., rest, ice, compression, elevation) and anti inflammatory medicine, can help relieve excessive discomfort in the tendon.

The tendon can take 6 to 12 weeks to heal depending on the extent of the injury.

As you probably know, doctors will check some of our nervous system functions via another type of “reflex test”. For example, striking the knee with a rubber mallet to make the leg jump is one such “reflex test”.

In addition to the knee, there are other nerve-function-test locations and one of these is the Achilles tendon. Not too long ago, the “reflex test” on the Achilles tendon was thought to indicate not just nerve function, but also an indicator of thyroid function.

As a Reflexologist, NOW you have my attention!

But what can I do with this piece of information?

Medical research that was conducted to test the Achilles-thyroid connection proved inconclusive and therefore has not been pursued as a reliable indicator.

However, it did have enough proponents to support the research and this does reinforce my gut reaction to the powerful energy that might held in this, the largest, strongest tendon of the body.

Maybe I can add the Achilles tendon into the reflexology session menu I create for a client who indicates they have a thyroid issue.

I will never use this amazing connection to diagnoses but I don’t do that in my work anyway.

What I do is support health balance with my wonderful reflexology techniques. I can “hold the space for healing to occur”, and that to me is the best reward, an honor and a gift.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology Event – THE Check List

October 31, 2011 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

When you’re just starting out in reflexology, this is a great way to hone your skills and build your client base…

Offer your reflexology at a conference, a corporate event or a health fair.

There are plenty of people there who want your service, but you’ll be wasting your time if you don’t plan ahead.

Early in my career, I did lots of these events, and I still have a handful of clients who have come to see me ever since.

It took me a lot of trial and error before I came up with a checklist. If you forget any of these items, you do so at your own peril.

I gathered all the materials I needed and kept them in a “kit” by my door.

When the phone would ring, I’d just need the time and location. And, then when I was about to leave for the event, I’d grab my case and would rest assured that I had everything I need.

You need to talk to the organizers to find out what they want you to do, whether it’s: 5 minute, 15 minute or 30 minute (etc.) sessions. Find out how long you’ll be working and then divide the session minutes by the length of the day and that’s the maximum number of sessions you can do.

Rest up the night before, it might be a long day.

Here’s my fail-safe “event check list”:

1. Fill a small pump bottle with your favorite lotion – no need to take the jumbo size – unless you’re working on a small army.

2. Take rubber or latex gloves – the kind you can get at the drugstore – and put as many pairs as you think you’ll need. You’ll need the gloves if there’s no hand washing facilities nearby. There will always be a bathroom, but sometimes it’s so far away, and for 10 minute sessions, a 15 minute hand washing break is not going to work between each guest.

3. Have a hand sanitizer packed. There are times when you’ll want to use it, so have a small bottle ready.

4. Bring your business cards! Oh how many times did I go without them and would kick myself all the way home. You can print your own with on “Avery Business Card” paper you can buy at Staples. Or, you can go to www.VistaPrint.com and get 250 business cards for free. Just make sure you order these at least a week in advance… rush orders are not free.

5. Have a sign in sheet. This is maybe the most important thing you pack! You want people to sign in so you can them if they give you permission. How do you get permission? Ask them. Tell them to call you if they have any questions or tell them “I’ll give you a call or send you a card with some reflexology follow up information… if that’s that okay?”

6. Have some tissues and/or paper towels handy. You never know when you’ll need to clean up a lotion spill or remove some “sock bunnies” from the toes or blow your nose. You might even offer a tissue to your client if your fabulous “sinus magic” techniques produce the desired effects.

7. Have a pillow-board or a small “boogie-board” (the small version of the kind of foam board you use for floating in the pool). You’ll need something to put over your knees unless you want to lug a big table or chair there and back.

8. Carry a clip board and some pens. Make it easy for them to give you their contact information.

9. Have your schedule ready for additional sessions.

10. Don’t forget to bring some gift certificates. One year I did more business with gifts than with follow-ups. Mention the next significant holiday…

In addition:

– Don’t forget – the magic is in the details

Be attentive and listen for what your clients needs.

– Be clear about your reflex location.

Never work beyond your client’s pain threshold.

– Even in a crowd, hold the healing space as sacred.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology and the Kidneys

November 20, 2009 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

There’s been a lot of buzz around reflexology these past few weeks. In part thanks to a recent segment on the Regis and Kelly TV morning show.

kidney_regisIt seems that Regis, a great proponent of reflexology, recently experienced a pain that was reminiscent of years ago when he had kidney stones.

As Regis tells the story, he was awaiting surgery to remove the stones, when a reflexologist came to the hospital to work on his feet.

The session was an hour and a half, and nothing (other than pain relief and comfort) happened during or immediately after. But, later that night, he actually passed the stones and his surgery for the next day was cancelled.

As the story goes, he was very happy and very impressed with reflexology, believing it’s what actually helped.

A few weeks ago on his TV show “Regis & Kelly”, he revisited reflexology and once again felt that his recent reflexology session was instrumental in relieving a considerable amount of his current discomfort.

I’ve included the link to the TV segment below, but first you might want to know more about why the kidneys play such an important function in our health and wellbeing.

Kidneys

These dark-red and bean-shaped organs are at the posterior aspect of the torso and sit close to the waste-line. One side of the kidney has an outward bulge (convex) and the other side is indented (concave). At the indented side of the kidney (the renal pelvis), there’s a cavity where the ureter is attached.

The ureters are long thin tubes (from 10 – 12 inches long) that connect the kidneys to the bladder. The waste from the kidneys (urine) is moved from the kidney to the bladder via peristaltic contractions. The bladder, which is located behind the symphysis pubis, is the reservoir where urine is stored before it leaves the body via the urethra.

Known altogether as the “renal” or urinary system, this system affects all parts of the body by keeping the fluids in balance, removing wastes, regulating electrolyte balance and blood pressure, and stimulating the production of red blood cells.

Function of kidneys

Removal of waste: This is the main function of the kidneys – the removal of waste products and excess water from the blood. Even though the kidneys process about 55 gallons of blood (filtering all your blood approximately 19 times per day), they only eliminate about two quarts of urine daily.

Hormones: In addition to the above, the kidneys also release three important hormones:

1. erythropoietin, or EPO – which stimulates the bone marrow to create red blood cells

2. Another hormone produced called rennin – it regulates blood pressure

3. And, calcitriol – the active form of vitamin D, which helps to maintain normal chemical balance in the body and calcium for bones.

Regulation of salts: A function that is critical to the regulation of the body’s salt, potassium, and acid content is performed by the kidneys. This happens when the kidneys produce the hormones and vitamins that affect the function of other organs. As mentioned above, one hormone produced by the kidneys stimulates the production of red blood cells. In addition, another hormone produced by the kidneys help to regulate your blood pressure, while others help control calcium metabolism.

Urine formation: There are a series of highly complex steps the kidneys use in the processes of producing urine for excretion.  Other elements are also processed for re-absorption into the body. Both are important processes and necessary to maintaining the body chemicals in stable balance.

Kidney Diseases

Kidney Stones: When urine chemicals crystallize they gather to form a kidney stone. Even though they begin small (smaller than a grain of sand), they can gradually grow larger (a quarter inch in diameter or larger). But, the size of the stone doesn’t matter as much as where it is located.

Some of the symptoms of kidney stones include: intense pain, sweating, nausea and vomiting  (all of which are fairly common with stones).

Emergency treatment for kidney stones includes an intravenous line that’s used for hydration and for the administration of medication, which may include an anti-inflammatory drug, and narcotics for pain control.

Nephrotic Syndrome: This can be a further complication and is a kidney disease where there’s abnormal leakage of protein. Symptoms are low levels of proteins in the blood and swelling in other parts of the body. Treatment of nephrosis includes control of the disease by finding and treating any underlying medical conditions that may have caused it. Commonly drugs, including a diuretic to reduce swelling and antibiotics to treat infection, are used along with medications to reduce the output of protein.

Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) Glomerulosclerosis: Sometimes scar tissue will form in the tiny blood vessels (called the glomeruli) inside the kidneys. The glomeruli are comprised of miles of vessels that filter urine from the blood. Dialysis, kidney transplantation, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are nonspecific agents that reduce proteinuria. One of the approaches to relieve this is through modifications that are made to the diet.

Home Remedies

  • If, it’s been said it once, it’s been said a hundred times – drink plenty of H2O. Being well hydrated and keeping the urine diluted will help prevent kidney stones from forming
  • Additionally, drinking about three to four quarts of water daily is thought by many to be the best cure for treating kidney infection as well other internal infections.
  • And, don’t forget your Vitamin C it’s also said to be good in treating kidney infections. Food sources such as salmon, almonds, oranges and dairy products are rich in Vitamin C.

How Can Reflexology Help?

In oriental medicine, the Kidney Meridian and specifically the first Kidney Meridian point (K1) is thought of as the “Source of Chi”.

kidney_feetAnd, the Kidney Meridian is located very close to our own reflexology Kidney Reflex!

The location of the kidney reflexes are on both the left and right feet and begin at the level of the “waist-line” or close to the base of the 2nd metatarsals.

Just like in the body, the kidney reflexes are found lateral to the spine. (Note: the right kidney sits under the liver and is slightly lower that the left).

Because of its multiple functions for the body, it’s always a good idea to give some extra attention to this important organ reflex when giving a reflexology session (don’t forget that this includes self-help too).

I always detail the kidney reflex if it has the feeling of a “change in tissue texture” on the foot. This is a detail that calls for thumb-walking to occur in more than one direction. If I do the first passes on the vertical, I’ll do a second round on the horizontal or diagonal directions as well.

And, don’t forget about all of the urinary system reflexes. It’s a small system and easy to detail in its entirety.

If you go to this video clip – you can hear Regis Philbin tell how reflexology helped him, and his kidneys… in his own words.

Regis tells his Reflexology Story –

1. Go to: http://bventertainment.go.com/tv/buenavista/regisandkelly/host_chat.html?bcpid=959373459&bclid=28549562001&bctid=45928380001

2. On the Right Side MENU Bar click onto: OCTOBER 22, 2009

3. Once the video starts to play, move the fast forward bar at the bottom of the video to approximately 4 minutes into the play time.

4. Enjoy Regis’ reflexology story.

Now, as a practitioner, how about adding this detail into every one your reflexology sessions? Even better, be the client and get a reflexology session yourself. Ask your practitioner to detail the urinary system reflexes and feel for yourself how powerful the energy balancing is.

Spend some quality reflex time with the “Sole Source of Chi” – the kidney reflexes. You’ll be support your client’s health and don’t be surprised if they have to excuse themselves to go to the bathroom either during or right after the session. I think of that as reflexology at work.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills and explore how beautifully reflexology supports us body and soul.

Here’s to your good reflexology health!

WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE IN YOUR NEWSLETTER OR WEBSITE?

You can as long as you include this complete blurb with it: Online health and reflexology expert Wendy I. Coad, the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” monthly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket you reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

« Previous PageNext Page »