Reflexology Business Ready?

September 19, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

Reflexology and How to Improve Your Business by Changing One Thing a Day:

I love the business end of reflexology although there once was a time when I didn’t. It took me years to overcome my disinterest in things that didn’t involve just the reflexology techniques.

Now, I’ve studied and practiced business and marketing just as hard as I did my craft. I even have a Business Telephone Buddy – someone I talk to every working day for 15 – 20 minutes. It can sometimes be hard when you work for yourself to keep the motivation steady, day in and day out. But these phone calls really help to keep me accountable to my goals and projects.

With someone to witness my steps forward and steps back, it’s a lot easier to stay focused on what I’ve dedicated myself to. I find it works best to have a buddy who is not in the same business, but not too far off in the other direction either. This way we can bounce ideas off each other and share our different tools, techniques and perspectives along the way.

Recently, my buddy announced that she was going to dedicate the next 30 days to doing something different to market her business, in a completely different way, every day. Not just different one day from the other, but different as in brand new approaches or systems she’s never tried before.

This isn’t a new idea, but it took my breath away the moment I heard it. It’s a well known fact that if you want to change a pattern, it takes 21 – 28 days to re-wire yourself to the new pattern.

Genius, I thought!… and, I’m going to do it too. So I picked a project – I’m a little superstitious, so I don’t want to tell you exactly what it is, but I’ve been trying to get a rhythm going around it (without success) for about a year!

Now, every day, for the next 30 days, I’m going to do at least one task that will be directly focused on this old avoidance pattern and make it into an inclusion pattern.

And, it’s working already. I’m heading straight into doing one task towards this goal, every day. I must say that having a buddy to witness my progress is setting me straight. I’m good at motivating myself (except in this one area) but now that task gets completed even if it’s only moments before our call.

In fact, it’s working so well that I want to invite you to do the same. Yes, it’s better with a buddy, but you can try it on your own too.

Are you ready?

How to Improve Your Business by Changing One Thing a Day:

Here are the 5 steps to get you started. Remember, it’s not about a 360 turn-around, it’s more about even, steady, consistent steps each day. It’s not forever either, so you will have to be creative.

1. Choose your task or goal (make sure it’s doable).

First decide what you want to change, improve or update.

2. Print out a calendar and mark out 30 days.

This is a great reminder, especially if you keep it by your table, on your desk or even next to your bed. Make sure it doesn’t interrupt your sleep, but it might be nice to wake up to what you goal or project is.

3. Do at least one thing towards that goal everyday.

Don’t… I repeat, do not make it too big of a task. It will likely undermine you if it’s seen as too big or becomes too overwhelming. Write out the larger parts and break them down into 15 or 30 minute tasks. If you’re having trouble with any one task, just do one minute of it that day… trust me, you can get even more done that way.

4. Make it something different from what you’ve done in the past.

It’s not the thing you know to do. It’s not the thing that you’ve already done. It’s finding unique or novel ways of doing something. Do make it an adventure and work out some completely different strategies or processes, even if at the start you’re not sure exactly what you’re doing. As long as no animals are harmed, you’ll be doing a good thing and learning something new.

5. Make the goal around anything you want to change.

If you are burnt out make it around saying no to 3 things every day. And, I don’t mean no in a stubborn way, but no as in – Nope, I need to take care of me and it’s just going to have to wait a bit longer.

Or, if you want to get more clients, call a past client one day, send out an email blast another day, set up shop at your local gym or yoga studio another day… Just make it anything that you haven’t done before.

Now, if you complete this – after 30 days you will have moved forward in ways you never would have thought possible and you’ll also establish a new pattern (so make it a good one).

And send an email to share some of your successes with me. info@reflexologyprof.com – I just might add them to a future newsletter and that way, together we can motivate others. I’ll look forward to hearing from you.
Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology and Infertility

August 6, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

The versatility of reflexology never ceases to amaze me.

Over the past several years I’ve seen an increase in the number of people who come to complementary and alternative medicine, for support of other treatments.

Reflexology and Infertility is just one of them.

In fact, it’s both men and women (and it should be both because this is hugely a couples thing) but, the larger numbers by far are women.

Let me say just one thing before continuing: reflexologists never diagnose, treat, or prescribe. If there is an illness or pathology you must see a medical doctor.

And, why wouldn’t you want to get the medical diagnosis and find out what the prescribed treatment is. Once done, you can choose whatever complementary modality – yes, read reflexology here – to help your body to help itself.

In reality the healer is really inside the body that needs the healing. Nothing else can take its place.

But our stress-relieving techniques also support most medical interventions and processes. And sometimes this support is what is needed the most.

This brings me back to our topic of infertility. Let me start at the beginning.

When learning about the body and its systems, I was fascinated to find out that for of the reproductive system there are primary and secondary components.

The primary reproductive system is comprised of the ovaries and testes. That’s it. And, the secondary part is… everything else.

It made me wonder – why only one primary organ and no t any of the other parts of the system.

Well, the primary is the only part that is also a member of the endocrine system – the hormone producing, regulating system of the body.

Let’s face it, as a species, we’re designed to do something very important in order for the species to survive. You guessed it, we’re designed to reproduce.

That’s why the endocrine glands are primary, that’s why everything else comes in second place – because without the parts that regulate, that give the all important instructions, well, in a way, nothing else really matters, does it?

Now, what happens when good evolution slows down?

That’s where we get issues with infertility, or, as some would call it, sub-fertility.

I like that second term because a lot of times it’s not broken, just a bit slow.

Again, knowing the “how’s and whys” is not our job, even though we can and should be knowledgeable.

Most importantly, reflexology can and does support the body in its own natural processes – balancing and healing.

Now, there seems to be a ground swell in regards to people seeking reflexology for infertility.

Maybe the information about reflexology is being passed around amongst those in need, perhaps in the clinics or the chat rooms.

I’ve noticed that over the past few years, there’s a definite increase in interest.

And, why wouldn’t there be?

Some reflexologists have made it a specialty. And, I personally have seen up to an 80% success rate with my reflexology clients who come for support with this particular goal.

That’s right – up to 80% have been successful. Happy everybody.

So what does that mean for reflexologists?

Well, the information we get is really an anecdotal statistic. I can’t, nor would I even want to ever claim to cure anything.

I have long contended that one of the most powerful things we do in our reflexology is to relax the body. And when stress is relieved a body does tend to work better in all its functions – powerfully and positively.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, one of the most important things that supports healing is touch – touch that is safe & compassionate, touch that is about the focus, the concentration, the listening and being non-invasive.

This touch is truly a universal healer. And, that’s the touch I’m talking about.

So what can a reflexologist do?

Now, here in America, there’s a commonly held belief that it’s best to cease doing our fabulous reflexology in the first trimester of pregnancy.

I do just that.

But here, there’s an issue of infertility, not pregnancy.

Common wisdom tells us to detail the reproductive organ reflexes, the endocrine reflexes, CNS reflexes and the lymphatic reflexes.

Why?

Because this support is not just aimed at relaxation for the body… it’s not just about the stress relief. It’s also about strengthening whatever needs strengthened so that the internal environment can be the best and strongest it can possibly be.

And, if fertility treatments are happening, then everyone’s on a schedule. There is a definite pattern… support, support, support, and then wait, wait, wait.

I do the same thing in scheduling my hope-to-be-pregnant clients – session, session, session and then after their treatment, wait, wait, wait.

Of course, pregnant women need their feet worked on. So once the pregnancy is past the first trimester, and there are no complications, I work on just about everything but the reproductive reflexes because they’re already happy!

Always remember, when in doubt about giving reflexology to anyone, at anytime – you must talk to a medical professional.

You won’t get medical advice from your instructor… unless they’re a doctor!

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology for the Senses

July 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

4 STEPS TO THE MOST POWERFUL RELAXATION REMINDERS I CREATE FOR MY CLIENTS…AND FOR MYSELF

As Reflexologists we have powerful Reflexology “tools” at our disposal that offer our clients deep relaxation and relief from stress. And what happens to our bodies when we’re relaxed and DE-stressed. We feel better. Our bodies can return to balance faster. Our healing processes are supported.

Is that enough? It’s a lot already. But what if you had an opportunity to offer even greater relaxation, with minimum effort. That’s right almost nothing more for you to do in the session work.

Easy, you think. Well, you’re right. Here are “the 4 most powerful relaxation reminders I create for my clients…and for myself.”

  1. Consider THE VISUAL – You want the surroundings for your clients and for you to be relaxing, calm and peaceful. In my office I have lots of fabrics, calming images, sculpture and curtains (which hide some of my storage, for me a necessity, for my clients it eliminates any visual clutter). You can work in an office, your home or a rented space but keep the area of your work visually calm and soothing. How can you do this at home or if you share a rental space? An inexpensive solution is to use screens and curtains to separate living and working areas in your home. In a rental space, bring some fabrics and pin or drape them to set the tone and offset that office feeling. A silk fabric or a beautiful floral banner can fit nice and lightly into any Reflexology travel kit. This creates a memory or reminder for relaxation. 
  2. Consider THE AUDITORY – Have a pleasant sounding environment. This too can create a memory or reminder for relaxation. Try a cascading fountain or a sound machine that produces gentle nature sounds. Music-only tapes and CD’s that have soothing melodies are great. Remember it’s best if there are no words to the music. Why no words? People naturally go into their heads when they hear words. Some songs might have sad memories attached, which is another reason why “neutral” works best. And…REMEMBER that for people who work in the music business, any music might put them in work mode. Often they’ll request silence. Sound can be powerfully relaxing or a stress trigger. Bottom line – offer the option and let the client choose. 
  3. Consider THE TACTILE – This is what we do. We create a relaxing touch experience for our clients. It’s touch that’s safe, compassionate and therapeutic. The tactile can also be represented in color and the textures of our table linens: sheets and coverings. Again, this creates a memory or reminder for relaxation 
  4. Consider THE AROMATIC – First, choose whether to work with aromas or not. If your space has any kind of odd or musty smell then the choice has already been made for you! If you can’t move, AROMA INVIGORATE! Did you know that several common essential oils are anti-viral, anti-septic, anti-fungal AND anti-biotic. Remember that around cold season! And did you know there’s no standard to the essential oil industry? All essential oil products differ. Some of the “best” blends can have other oils added (still pure and natural, but you’re paying a lot for common vegetable and nut oil extenders). You need to research and trust your distributor. For those who choose Aromatherapy, you’re session space should have a pleasant supportive aroma. You can change the mood of the session, i.e. uplifting, calming, healing, etc. … with your choice of pure essential oils. The mere whiff of the pure and natural essential oils that I use, “evokes a little bit of Wendy Heaven”, as one of my clients described it.

Several clients, whenever they enter my office, say they immediately feel relaxed. That’s before I’ve done anything!

Remember my reference to Pavlov? Well, my clients senses are reminding them of the previous sessions and how relaxing and good they felt.

I choose to work with these powerful healing tools because of their versatility in my sessions.

My clients draw real benefits from this. They can also be reminded and brought back into relaxation at any point afterward, just by carrying an oil previously used in the Reflexology session.

It’s true that some clients will request “no aroma” at all. In this case, it’s easy to keep your space neutral since aromas diffuse quickly. Only a very, very few clients won’t be able to tolerate any aroma. And in fact, I don’t have any such clients.

I LOVE working with AROMATHERAPY.

I carry 2-3 essential oils with me at all times. They’re in small bottles and they’re life savers.

Where have they saved me most often? On airplanes, on the streets of New York City and in taxis and subways. I know it’s so pedestrian (no pun) but more than once, I’ve reached for an oil and saved my nose and sanity!

Want to learn more? Everything you need to know is in my Aromatherapy Workshop and my Gemstone Therapy Workshop. They starts next month!

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills!

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

One Reflexology Question Not to Miss

June 27, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

As reflexologists, we all keep records of our clients contact information and health history, including what their chief complaints are.

It’s a standard in the field and if you’re nationally ARCB certified, you already have what I think is the best client intake form ever. For those of you who aren’t (why wouldn’t you be?) there are client health history forms in many books.

Some intake forms are long and some are short, but there’s one very important question that I hope you are asking.

On the surface this question might not seem as important as many of the others. Don’t be fooled by how simple it is. Early in my career, I wasn’t sure how important it was but I quickly learned its value, and now I never start without it:

“How would you rate your present state of health? (circle one) Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor.”

That’s it. Almost…

It’s not enough to stop there because after getting the answer, I then need to ask one more question.

After looking at the client’s answer, my next question is… “and what would it take for you to say _____”?

For example, if they reported an answer of “Good”, next I’ll say “and what would it take for you to say – Excellent”?

If they reported Fair, I’ll say “and what would it take for you to say, Good… or Excellent”?

If they reported Poor, I’ll say “and what would it take for you to say, Fair… Good… or Excellent”?

The only time I don’t use this second question is if they say they already rate their current health as “Excellent”. There’s always room for improvement, but I usually take an “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” attitude here.

Okay, getting back to the second question… are you seeing a pattern here?

Why would I want to know what it would take for some improvement to occur? Haven’t I already gotten information about past and recent illness, injury, etc.

Yes indeed. And I will definitely work to help the organ system reflexes, but this particular question is more about quality of life. It points to health goals and personal goals like no other question can.

Let me give you an example: “Client 1” reports that they would rate their present state of health as “Good”. (Remember, I already have the health history, so it’s great information in addition to all the rest.)

I’ll ask: “and what would it take for you to say… Excellent”?

They might report that they are trying to lose some weight, or report that they would like to exercise more, or have some time for themselves.

That’s when I become a “cheer-leader” for these quality of life goals.

Once I have this information I can align with supporting them in this aspect of their journey as well.

I’ll have suggestions or referrals to make. It might be simple ideas about exercise or diet, or I might know someone who I can refer them to for more expert advice.

Sometimes just talking about these goals will start the wheels turning in their head as well as mine… and sometimes not. I never force the conversation and I will ask for their permission before I make my suggestions. That way I’ll stay within their expectations for a reflexology session and my scope of practice.

This is always a great component to the session, so don’t lose out on this additional supportive opportunity.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology & Yorick

June 18, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

Hamlet: “Alas, poor Yorick! …he hath borne me on his back a thousand times.”

Yorick’s skull: “If you ask me, I’m still carrying the whole scene!”

— Christopher Reeve as Hamlet, on The Muppet Show

It’s hard for me to believe that even today, there are people who can’t tell the difference between reflexology and massage.

Now there’s nothing wrong with massage and a good foot massage can be wonderful. It’s a personal preference and personally, I’ll keep looking until I find an actual reflexologist.

When I went to massage school I knew, as soon as my neck sent shooting tingles and numbness down my right arm, that at my age I was not going to last long in such a labor-intensive field.

(In a recent job analysis it was found that the average age of a reflexologist is 51 and she already has a college education. While researching massage, I found that on average a massage therapist is no longer working in the field after about 2 years, in part because of the strain on the body.)

But because of my training, I can now say with some authority that reflexology has little or nothing to do with massage and here, quite simply, is the reason why.

The focus of massage is the soft tissue of the body. When giving a massage, the focus is predominantly on the muscles, tendons, ligaments, attachments, connective tissue, etc.

Sure, when giving a massage you consider the whole body, but I guarantee that when a massage therapist is working on the gastrocnemius their focus is on the leg, the back, and not on a specific organ – like the kidneys, the colon or any other organ in the body.

But, when I work with reflexology, my focus is almost entirely aimed towards the organ systems of the body. I care less about the foot – it’s muscles and attachments – than I do about the kidneys, the liver, the large and small intestines, the heart or the thyroid, to name a few. And, although I’m not treating these organs, as a reflexologist my goal is to “energetically” support their function.

The focus of massage is on the muscles. The focus of reflexology is on the organs. Period.

If we take a look at the history of reflexology, it’s closest parallel is more likely to be with chiropractics than with massage.

Now this, I can understand. (And, no – there is no bone crunching with reflexology… ever!)

The premise of chiropractics is that the alignment of the spine has an impact on all of the organs on the body. Therefore good spine alignment is necessary for optimum health and poor alignment can impact the organs in a negative way.

Of course spinal alignment can be an aggressive procedure and in the mid 1900’s there were several well-publicized cases where people died from chiropractics.

I believe this was one of the reasons that, as recently as the 1960’s, chiropractics was outlawed (as in not legal to practice) in many states – including New York!

Another reason proved to be what I call “turf wars” between chiropractors and allopathic medicine.

They had to fight for many years and their case went through several court systems until eventually a U. S. District Court Judge decided that the American Medical Association “had engaged in a lengthy, systematic, successful and unlawful boycott, designed to eliminate the profession of chiropractic as a competitor.”

But now, instead of being called “an unscientific cult” and “the chiropractic menace”, you can become a Doctor of Chiropractics.

As for the science and medicine behind chiropractics, they have a similar anecdotal history with no absolute scientific proof, just like reflexology.

I’ve never heard of reflexology causing death but maybe in the early days, while our histories were more parallel, if it had…. we’d all be “Doctors of Reflexology” too.

I’m truly glad that our gentle, non-invasive techniques have never been proven to harm anyone… but please, don’t tell me that reflexology is massage either.

chirobase.org/05RB/BCC/postscript.html

chiroeco.com/news/chiropractic-news.php?id=2685

wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_chiropractic

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.comand join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology and Cancer

May 28, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

I’m always looking out for trends and innovations in reflexology. If reflexology and cancer isn’t the biggest one today, I don’t know what is.

In the days of my early bodywork training (Polarity Therapy – yes, there was a time in my life before reflexology!), students were cautioned about working with cancer patients – even when working off the body!

Thank goodness compassionate touch has won the day. It’s better to comfort with gentle touch than to deny the stress relieving comfort and nurturing that it affords.

As with all medical situations, you need to get an okay from a doctor in order to work with anyone who is very sick – whether from an illness or from the treatment of a disease.

However, if the opportunity arises to work with someone who has cancer, consider yourself lucky because they’ll already have a variety of medical supports. This will be a team of one, or many, of the following: doctors, nurses, osteopaths, physical therapists, acupuncturists, etc. Becoming a member of that team is a privilege.

Now, everyone on the team needs to know about each other. This only makes sense. Call the doctor(s) and introduce yourself, say that their client has asked to receive reflexology from you and find out whether this is okay and if there is anything you need to know.

I’ve never once had the experience of a doctor being dismissive. On the contrary the response has been positive, although you do need to be prepared to explain what reflexology is.

Here’s some useful information, research and resources currently available for reflexology and cancer:

1. As I’ve mentioned before, the University of Michigan received a 1.3 million dollar grant from the NIH (National Institute of Health) to study reflexology as a support for the effects of the treatment breast cancer. As their website states:

“Breast cancer patients turn to reflexology for comfort”

EAST LANSING, Mich. — Researchers at Michigan State University are finding that many women who are receiving chemotherapy while in the late stages of breast cancer are turning to a complementary therapy known as reflexology to help them cope.

In a pilot study, researchers from MSU’s College of Nursing tested three different complementary therapies — reflexology, guided imagery and reminiscence therapy, in which women recall times in their lives when they’ve met and overcome challenges. Of those three, reflexology proved to be the most effective…

2. The Memorial Sloane-Kettering Cancer Center, in New York City, has, in the past, offered a two day course in “Reflexology for the Cancer Patient”.

From all reports it has been an amazing learning experience aimed at giving reflexologists with the best information possible for working with cancer patients.

3. The First Symposium on Reflexology and Cancer was held in Israel in 2008.

It turned out to be a stellar symposium with speakers, research and supporting techniques offered by speakers from around the world.

4. My favorite book on cancer and bodywork is “Medicine Hands, Massage Therapy for People with Cancer”, by Gayle MacDonald, M.S., L. M. T.

Although geared towards massage therapists, it gives you great and important information about the different types of the disease and the effects of many of the treatments — both on the patient and also on the caregiver or therapist.

If there’s a better book out there, please drop me a line and let me know.

You’ve heard me talk about how inspiring my mother was to me. What you might not know is that she had cancer four times.

And, she survived (make that thrived) for over 40 more years.

Towards the end of her life she had Alzheimer’s and I gave her reflexology – not so much to heal her, but rather to communicate with and demonstrate with every gentle alternating thumb and finger walking pressure that she is not alone, that she is special, that I care and that I am present… in the moment… with her.

(Today would have been her birthday. Happy Birthday Mom!)

Healing is never a one person experience. With reflexology, as with other complementary and alternative modalities, healing is a profoundly shared experience.

For many people, cancer is a passage into another part of life. For some it is their final passage. To walk alongside anyone who has embarked upon this journey and to hold their hands or feet is truly an honor.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology and mom

May 15, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

Until quite recently, I’d forgotten that I’d been around reflexology at a very young age.

You see my great uncle Alvin was a reflexologist which he combined with his pedorthy practice.

In those days, pedorthy – shoe sizing, measuring and fitting footwear – was a more common professional career. People knew how important the feet are and took better care of them back then.

Uncle Alvin was practicing reflexology as early as the 1940’s.

When my brother was young he had asthma and hay-fever. It almost killed him once – so my mom took him to my uncle for reflexology.

She said it helped a lot.

Mom was always one to try things she thought were important. One day while I was visiting, a few years before she went into the nursing home, she reached into the back of her closet and pulled out a small packet of papers.

“Here” she said, “I saved these for you, dear. I thought you’d like to have them one day”.

I looked at the neatly folded papers, one with an old stamp of a young Queen and another a green brochure in a protective plastic bag.

It took me a moment to realize what these papers were.

As early as 1948, my mother had written a letter to Eunice Ingham requesting information on a “reflexologist in our area… for a friend”.

Eunice wrote back on the same typed page mom had sent her and reported she didn’t know specifically of anyone, but that buying one of her books could certainly help.

A reflexologist AND a business woman!

The other papers were flyers for reflexology workshops and forms to order books. All kept safe for so many years.

But, in my hands was the reflexologists equivalent of an ingot of pure gold.

Nothing could have made me happier.

I talk about my mother, Irene, often because she’s been an inspiration to me my whole life. And, she still is.

Towards the end of her life, she had Alzheimer’s disease, was blind, and no longer able to communicate very well.

Irene was well into her nineties, still an amazing person and luckily, she was in an amazing eldercare facility. Even though her recollection of me had grown dim at best, we spend lots of wonderful time together.

Sometimes we talk about the very distant past. At various times she considers me her mother, father, daughter, sister or… a stranger.

One thing we could always do together was reflexology. And since her hands were so easy to reach, I’d often give her a soothing Hand Reflexology session.

Although the disease had decreased her responsiveness, as soon as I’d take her hand she’d turns towards me and smile.

Because of her cataracts, she could no longer see me but she could feel the warmth of my hands and the love in my touch.

It was such a gift to be able to communicate with her in this way because so many avenues, that I once took for granted, had since been cut off.

We’d sit together, her hand in mine and I’d slowly and gently do some relaxation techniques. I’d use a little extra lotion and was careful not to pull the dorsal skin. With age her skin became extremely thin and the vessels were very prominent. On the palm side, I’d scoop my fingertips in just a little bit.

Her hands were often cold so I’d wrap my hand around each finger and give a gentle squeeze (instead of the usual “coin rubbing” technique).

Sometimes she’d squeeze my hand back as if to say she’s happy I was there.

Holding each finger, just as I described, offers soothing balance to all the chakra elements: earth, water, fire, air and ether.

And, I’d remember that half the meridians in the body: lung, large intestine, triple energizer, pericardium, heart and small intestine, begin or end on each finger tip! (You’ll learn this, and a whole lot more, in the Professor’s Hand Reflexology program.)

Irene would usually be sitting in a chair that’s part-chair and part-bed. She could no longer walk at this point. There were not a lot of movements she could do.

It was incredible that she had no specific health issues. Still, all her systems were wearing down. She had none of the actions, movements – bending and straightening – that keeps us mobile with everything moving.

Although she wasn’t able to use the normal mechanics for system support and balance, I deeply trusted that these gentle Hand Reflexology sessions helped her organ systems as well as all the fluid tides.

So, I’d focus on the general session sequence. And use just a fraction of the pressure and one quarter of the usual session time.

There we sit, together for those precious moments, in deep connection and communication without needing to say any words.

And, I’ll treasure these moments forever.

The elderly and particularly nursing home patients are often stressed, disoriented and deprived of safe and meaningful touch.

To just take their hand in a compassionate way can have a tremendous impact.

You can just imagine what a soothing and relaxing touch – combined with the benefits of Reflexology – can do.

Remember to check with the medical staff before embarking on any technique with the elderly population.

I’m forever grateful for my sweet reflexology skills. They have given me a world where the possibilities are profound and endless.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology and the 10 Keys to Planning Sessions That Work!

April 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

In the last newsletter, I’d left off with #5:

Below are the remaining 6 Keys to Planning Sessions that Work” for Reflexologists (and other bodyworkers).

THE NEXT SET OF KEYS, #6 – 10
Here are the remaining steps…

6. Give clients a way to notice the difference they feel after the session.

This gives your client a way to measure, in their own body, the feeling of relaxation and their sense of well-being.

But, what if they don’t feel the benefits? You want to know that too.

By registering the tangible benefits, they’ll have even more reason to return.

A few clients will report no change, but the amount of sales you GAIN from this strategy can dramatically outweigh the risk.

7. Request immediate action for the follow up session and give them a time frame to start with.

Some reflexologists say goodbye and hope that the client will call again.

You need to take action and ask before they leave if they would like to book another session.

Even better you can give them a couple of dates in the next week or two that you have an opening.

You’re doing them a service by eliminating the time and inconvenience of having to call back, leave a message, etc.

If you’ll be raising your price soon or you’ll be away from your office or doing a benefit event – let them know this or say there’s a discount for booking in advance because it will save you the administrative cost of call-back or hiring a booking service.

Clients love it when savings are passed on to them.

8. Give your clients an Action Plan.

It’s a good idea to give your client some suggestions about they can do to help themselves between sessions.

Since they are ultimately responsible for their own health, it can be a great help to give them a plan or get them back on the path towards their goals.

Try not to make it too big of a task, because if they don’t accomplish it they might feel badly.

If I don’t have any unique ideas for them to try, I’ll ask them about what they already know. I find something that does work for them and then I suggest that they increase this activity (or decrease it as the case may be) by 10%.

I’ll sometimes suggest that they do no more than 10%, (which can always be added on to in the future). That’s because if they fail to achieve it, nothing big is lost.

9. Make one last suggestion.

In parting ask your client if, as a courtesy reminder, they would like you to call before their next scheduled session.

Or, if they haven’t booked a next session, ask if they would like you to touch base with them in a week or 2.

If they give you permission to call, make sure you do, but don’t try to “sell them a session”. Make the communication about them and not about you.

10. Don’t forget to let your client know that they can contact you for any information!

Clients WILL have questions, so provide an easy way to get a hold of you with your phone number and e-mail address, and add your website too, especially if it has a section for FAQ’s (frequently asked questions).

As I mentioned in s previous step – give yourself an “action plan” if you do just 10% of these steps, you should reap the benefits and if you do them all, I know you’ll be amazed by the power of these.

Here’s to your good session (and business) health!

Enjoy your wonderful Reflexology skills.

© Wendy Coad

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology and the Best 10 Keys to Planning a Session the Works!

April 16, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

I’ll start in no particular order, all are good and warrent you attention.

THE FIRST SET OF KEYS, #1 – 5

1. Draw Them in with a Kick-Butt Session Plan. This alone can mean the difference between success and failure.

You have just so much time to make a difference in their lives. The best way to do this is to appeal to their concerns and interests. Find out what their goals are, then be sure you have a system in place to monitor their success.

Bad: “Reflexology can help you feel better.”

Better: “Let’s turn team up to turn your energy level around in 4 weeks.”

Obviously your documentations will help you record their progress, but you might want to create an additional scale to refine and monitor this even further.

2. Be Conversational! You heard right.

You’ve probably learned that the less you talk, the deeper your sessions will be experienced.

And that’s true.

However there are times when you need to talk to your client, either at the intake or occasionally during the session.

In this case, talk to you client like a dear, respected friend. Don’t be afraid of using phrases like “And, what would you like session to focus on today?”

Avoid formality and use short easy phrases. Why? Even if you think they can’t possibly misunderstand – a few people will still be confused. Plus, being conversational helps clients feel like they can trust you more.

TIP: Don’t go overboard… no back slapping here. And whatever you do, don’t carry the conversation too far into the session. Remember, it’s more relaxing when you’re not talking.

3. Don’t be Practitioner Centered – Be Client Centered. Just like their brochures, a lot of practitioners talk on about how great Reflexology is… how great a practitioner they are… Hello? Client, anyone?

It’s better to think the way your client is probably thinking, “What’s in it for me?”

Poll your friends and relatives. If you can, talk with some of your clients and ask them:

  1. Why they chose you (you’ll also know how they look for help), and
  2. What they get out of your service (you’ll find out how they experience the benefits).

TIP: To instantly make your service more client-focused, insert the word “you” often.

4. Focus on the Benefits, not just the Features. The fact that you offer the best Reflexology is great, but what does it DO for your client? Does it give her a better quality of life? Does it give her “knock out” relaxation? Give her peace of mind?

Here’s an example: If you’re going to seek out Depak Chopra or Carolyn Myss, you’re not just going to these “stars” to hear about your health. You’re choosing who the wealthy, most selective clients see. So that’s what this particular “healer” sells.

It matters less how good their work is. (Dry that tear… you know it’s true!)

So, think about what your clients are really looking for.

For example: What does an insurance broker sell? If you answered “insurance policies” you’ve missed my point.

If you answered “peace of mind”… you’ve got it.

5. Nix the “Jive” Talk. Keep your explanations simple and avoid the jargon. Just stick to the facts… and the benefits. An easy way to weed out the mumbo jumbo is to think of dear old aunt Millie, listening to you. Would she get it? If not clarify and simplify.

Talk to the level that your client can understand. When I use analogies to explain something, I try to keep it relevant to their interests.

Recently I was struggling to explain Reflexology to a 7 year old. His mom helped me with this one. After a few failed attempts on my part she said, “it’s like a computer… you can press here”, pointing to his feet (keyboard) “and it effects something over there, (hard drive).”

Not only did he get it, but he loved it! Thanks, Mom.

Stay tuned…. I’ll fill you in on the rest of the list – “THE 10 KEYS TO PLANNING A SESSION THAT WORKS! KEYS #6 – 10” in your next newsletter.
Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology & Atheletes Foot

April 2, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

I’ve been practicing for so long that I remember when I trained, we worked with people with their socks on. At the time it was considered appropriate – especially if they had a foot fungus.

That was silly, because socks are not a barrier to foot fungus, aka – athletes foot. If there’s a fungus on the foot then there’s a fungus on the sock and there’s a fungus in the shoe.

Before you say eeewwww, remember that the fungus that causes athletes foot is a thing of nature and found just about everywhere. It’s on the floor and on the door and in the air too.

But it won’t thrive in most places. It thrives mainly in places that are:

1. warm

2. dark

3. damp

And that’s why the warm, damp feet of perspiration soaked athletes (feet that are housed in the darkness of a shoe that’s been worn over and over) is like a holiday cruise for that fungus. It never wants to leave.

I’ll often send my clients who have what looks like athletes foot to see an appropriate professional for help, like their local pharmacist or podiatrist. There are many over-the-counter and prescription medicines that are said to help.

But, if the client fails to also do a few simple things that I’ve listed below, the likelihood for success is diminished.

If you are actively trying to eliminate a fungus, you have to actively “clean up” its immediate environment, and by that I mean minimize the warm, dark, damp factor as much as possible.

How?

Follow these steps:

1. Switch to a cotton (or a wool blend) sock – when fighting fungus you need to minimize the warmth and moisture factor and natural fibers will absorb moisture and/or keep the foot “cooler”. Nylon and polyester socks are like mini saunas and need to be avoided for the time being. A blend is okay as long as it’s 80% natural and no more than 20% synthetic.

Change your socks every day (at least).

2. Never wear the same pair of shoes every day. Fungus can stay active for up to 3 days in a shoe so you want to let the pair of shoes you wore on Monday air-out until Thursday before you put them on again. Otherwise, and especially if you are treating the foot, you will likely transfer the same fungus back to the foot, and so on… foot to shoe… shoe to foot.

3. Remember to dry between your toes after taking a bath, a shower, after exercise and at the end of every day. This is sometimes hard for the elderly because it requires some flexibility that they may no longer have. It might explain be why foot fungus is more prevalent amongst the elderly too.

What about reflexology?

Well, for starters athletes foot is contraindicated for foot reflexology because it might be transmitted. And, it’s just plain uncomfortable – dry, itchy, rash-like, with broken skin – especially between the toes.

That’s why there’s hand reflexology, so work on the hands until the feet clear up.

Thinking about it, if fungus is everywhere then it’s the job of the immune system to protect us. If a fungus has gotten past it, then a detail to the immune system reflexes is in order.

If medication is being used, supporting the body in its natural detoxification processes with a focus on the elimination systems might be helpful, including the colon, kidney, lung and liver reflexes.

Include the parathyroid reflex too (in my last newsletter I wrote about psoriasis, another skin condition, and how calcium is sometimes not balanced in the area of concern).

That should clear up some of the mystery surrounding “tinea pedis” (the Latin name for foot fungus) so that your clients can enjoy the wonderful benefits of reflexology.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

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