Reflexology and the Bronchial Tubes

April 2, 2009 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

I don’t know about you, but this season I was hit by a whopping case of bronchitis. It’s happened to quite a few people and it was a wicked strain this year. It made me think about these little tubes that hold our lives so dear.

When was the last time that you noticed the twelve to twenty times per minute, each and every day (and night), you breathe — thanks to your body’s respiratory system.

Oxygen is a vital fuel that goes to every cell in your body. And, your cells needs oxygen supplied regularly each and every minute. In fact if a cell doesn’t get oxygen within about 4 minutes, well… it’s a dead cell.

Your lungs expand and contract, supplying life-sustaining oxygen to your body and removing a waste product called carbon dioxide.

When a person breathes, air comes in through the nose or mouth and then goes into the trachea (windpipe). From there, it passes through the bronchial tubes. These tubes or airways, let air in and out of your lungs, so that you can breathe. There are 2 – one going into each lung.

Bronchial tubes, or bronchi are divided at the end of the windpipe (trachea) to left and right. These main bronchi then branch into progressively smaller airways (bronchioli) ending in microscopic numerous sacks (alveoli). Oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged between air and blood through thin alveoli.

Bronchial tubes are one of the main sites for airway inflammation that leads to bronchoconstriction.

Anatomy of Bronchial tubes

The trachea (windpipe) divides into two main bronchi (also mainstem bronchi), the left and the right, at the level of the sternal angle.

The right main bronchus is wider, shorter, and more vertical than the left main bronchus.

The left main bronchus subdivides into two lobar bronchi while the right main bronchus divides into three.

The lobar bronchi divide into tertiary bronchi. There are ten segments per lung, (but due to anatomic development, several segmental bronchi in the left lung fuse, giving rise to eight).

The segmental bronchi divide into many primary bronchioles which divide into terminal bronchioles, each of which then gives rise to several respiratory bronchioles, which go on to divide into 2 to 11 alveolar ducts. There are 5 or 6 alveolar sacs associated with each alveolar duct

There is hyaline cartilage present in the bronchi, present as irregular rings in the larger bronchi (and not as regular as in the trachea), and as small plates and islands in the smaller bronchi. Smooth muscle is present continuously around the bronchi.

Okay, I’m sure that by now you understand that there are many, many branches of bronchi.

The Role in Disease

Bronchitis is defined as inflammation of the bronchi. There are two main types:

  • Acute bronchitis is usually caused by viral or bacterial infections.

Acute bronchitis is an infection of the bronchia tree. The bronchial tree is made up of the tubes that carry air into your lungs. When these tubes get infected, they swell and mucus (thick fluid) forms inside them. This makes it hard for you to breathe.

The symptoms of acute bronchitis can include:

  • Sore throat
  • Fever
  • A cough that may bring up yellow or green mucus
  • Chest congestion
  • Shortness of breath
  • Wheezing
  • Chills
  • Body aches
  • Chronic bronchitis is a form of COPD, usually associated with smoking or long-term exposure to irritants.

Asthma is hyper reactivity of the bronchi with an inflammatory component, often in response to allergens.

What can Reflexology Do?

I think you can easily tell that it’s important to keep your lungs and bronchi in good working order. In fact, your life depends on it.

If you or anyone you know think they have a problem there – asthma or bronchitis, etc. – it’s very important to get the appropriate medical attention.

As with any illness, stress is always a factor. Rest is important and the stress relief that reflexology brings is a wonderful component to any health maintenance regime.

So where are the bronchial reflexes?

The bronchi have a very specific reflex location – bilateral – found on the plantar aspect of the foot between the first and second metatarsal heads.

And, since they’re part of the respiratory reflex system they are well suited to working in a detailed way.

You might have noticed on some people’s feet, there are thin calluses on just that thin space between metatarsal heads one and two.

Of course, you’ll want to detail the reflexes for the whole respiratory system.

Another set of reflexes you’ll likely want to detail is the immune system reflexes.

And, don’t forget the lung – large intestine connection too.

Common Home Remedies for Bronchial Health

  • It’s thought that Vitamin B6 and Vitamin B12 are very important nutrients to helping to decrease the inflammation in the lungs.
  • Many say that Vitamin C helps the body to fight infection, increase the amount of oxygen and reduce inflammation.
  • Some would tell you to eat salmon 3 times a week and take salmon oil capsules.
  • Careful with this but drinks with caffeine may dilate the bronchial airways.
  • Honey is one of the most common home remedies for soothing the throat and chest.
  • Among fruits, figs have proved very valuable in draining off the phlegm. Common wisdom says that three or four dry figs cleaned thoroughly with warm water and soaked overnight.
  • Lemon is another fruit thought to be beneficial in the treatment of asthma. The juice of one lemon, diluted in a glass of water and taken with meals, might help bring some good results.

As always, there’s so much more I’d like to share with you. I’ll be adding more great reflexology information in future newsletters.

Hand Reflexology and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

March 10, 2009 by  
Filed under Reflexology Teaching

Every reflexologist needs to know about the carpal tunnel. It’s important because you’ll have clients that complain about it. Equally important – you want to avoid getting it yourself. And, if you already have it you need to be especially careful.

You’ve heard me over and over again – I say that we reflexologists don’t treat, don’t prescribe and don’t diagnose. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t know what’s going on.

Clients often hope that reflexology will be a magic bullet to their health woes. I can’t say it will be, and I can’t help but smiling too.

Why?

Because, most people will experience a reduction in pain and/or symptoms with Hand Reflexology. That’s true for local issues on the hands – even though they’re not the intended destination.

This is important – let me explain.

Carpal tunnel syndrome is pain or weakness in your forearm and hand caused by pressure on a nerve in your wrist.  It is a medical condition in which the median nerve is compressed at the wrist, leading to paresthesias, numbness and muscle weakness in the hand.

The median nerve controls sensations to the palm side of the thumb and fingers (although not the little finger), as well as impulses to some small muscles in the hand that allow the fingers and thumb to move.

The carpal tunnel – a narrow, rigid passage way of ligament and bones at the base of the hand – houses the median nerve and tendons.

Sometimes, thickening from irritated tendons or other swelling narrows the tunnel and causes the median nerve to be compressed.

Symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome:

Symptoms most often occur in the parts of the hand supplied by the median nerve: the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and half of the ring finger.

If your little finger is not affected, this may be a sign that the condition is carpal tunnel syndrome, because the little finger is usually controlled by a different nerve (the ulnar nerve) than the thumb and other fingers.

Symptoms usually start gradually, with frequent burning, tingling, or itching numbness in the palm of the hand and the fingers (especially the thumb and the index and middle fingers).
Carpal tunnel syndrome is often the result of a combination of factors that increase pressure on the median nerve and tendons in the carpal tunnel, rather than a problem with the nerve itself.

Some other symptoms are:

  • Tingling, numbness, weakness, or pain felt in the fingers or, less commonly in the pal
  • Pain in your forearm, wrist or palm
  • More numbness or pain at night than during the day. The pain may be so bad it wakes you up. You may shake or rub your hand to get relief
  • More pain when you use your hand or wrist more
  • Trouble gripping object
  • Weakness in your thumb

Fact: Women are three times more likely than men to develop carpal tunnel syndrome, perhaps because the carpal tunnel itself may be smaller in women than in men.

Causes:

The Carpal Tunnel Syndrome causes might be due to work conditions or due to underlying medical problems.

Other causes that could lead to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome are:

  • Pregnancy
  • Rheumatoid arthritis and other causes of inflammation of the wrist
  • Endocrine disorders such as diabetes and hypothyroidism
  • Wrist fracture
  • Alcoholism

Risk associated with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome:

The following are risk factors associated with the development of carpal tunnel syndrome:

  • Repetition
  • High force
  • Awkward joint posture
  • Direct pressure
  • Vibration, and
  • Prolonged constrained posture
  • Poor ergonomics

Diagnosis:

If you, or your client has some or all of these symptoms – unless you’re a medical professional you cannot diagnose it.

In fact, when a client tells me they have carpal tunnel syndrome I always ask who made the diagnosis. It makes a difference whether it was a doctor or a specialist – or their aunt Betty or someone at the local gym.

There are a few simple tests that can be done to check general function of the wrist (you’ll learn those in the Hand Reflexology Workshop and more). This will help emphasize the importance for your client to seek the appropriate medical help.

Of course, early diagnosis and treatment are important to avoid permanent damage to the median nerve.

A physical examination of the hands, arms, shoulders, and neck can help determine if the patient’s complaints are related to an underlying disorder or to daily activities.

The wrist is examined for tenderness, swelling, warmth, and discoloration.

Each finger should be tested for sensation, and the muscles at the base of the hand should be examined for strength and signs of atrophy.

Routine laboratory tests and X-rays can reveal diabetes, arthritis, and fractures.

Treatment:

Treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome vary and should begin as early as possible, under a doctor’s direction.

  • Underlying causes such as diabetes or arthritis should be treated first.
  • If there is inflammation, applying cool packs can help reduce swelling.

Non-surgical treatments:

There are a couple of homeopathic creams that might help the symptoms:

Brands like Traumeel (a calendula and arnica based ointment) and Topricin (with 11 homeopathic ingredients) have both shown effectiveness and are available in many health food stores.

In special circumstances, various drugs can ease the pain and swelling associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. NSAIDS such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and other nonprescription pain relievers, may ease symptoms that have been present for a short time or have been caused by strenuous activity.

Alternative support therapies – Hand Reflexology, Acupuncture and chiropractic care have benefited some patients.

Exercise – Stretching and strengthening exercises can be helpful in people whose symptoms have abated.

Doctors will sometimes suggest that one wear a wrist splint (can be purchased at most drugstores) to keep the wrist in a neutral position at rest. Splinting is usually tried for a period of 4-6 weeks.

What can Reflexology Do?

As a reflexologist, why would I even care about carpal tunnel syndrome if it’s not my job to fix it?
Remember, if you or anyone you know even thinks they have this problem – it’s very important they get the appropriate medical attention.

And, I’m repeating myself here too – with any illness, stress is always a factor. Rest is important and the stress relief that Hand Reflexology brings is a wonderful component to any health maintenance regime.

If carpal tunnel is acute (meaning it hurts or it’s active now) you won’t want to work on the area directly.

There are a lot of things to know and even more to think about. Be very careful with any nerve impingement.

I’ve learned this from my own experience – nerves do not like to be irritated – because it just make them, well, crankier. Not good.

If you’re trained in Hand Reflexology you know that there are some very specific strategies to support the body in its own healing process.

And, what about the reflexes?

Good point. There are specific reflexes in the area and as a good reflexologist, you need to also be focused on the systems of the body.

Be curious about these reflex area – does the client also have sciatica? Do they have any reproductive or digestive issues?

Inherent in the Hand Reflexology techniques (I can’t say what others teach, usually – not this much), are techniques that will let you work safely to relax the hand.

And, what if you don’t have this specific training? – I suggest that you work the good hand and the opposite foot – or the ears.

The benefits of reflexology can be nothing short of amazing.

And, it’s never been more apparent than in the UK where an British media article from 2004 reports that; “According to a survey conducted on behalf of Yellow Pages…, the number of high street greengrocers has declined by almost 60 per cent in 10 years, while the number of reflexologists is up over 800 per cent.”

I rest my case.