15 Tips for Career Longevity

June 1, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

After practicing reflexology for 20 years, I’ve noticed a few things that work and a some that don’t. Today I’ve compiled a list of the most important things to do for career longevity.

I call it my “Reflexology Career Longevity Ergonomic Check List”. Take a look and see where you stand (or sit):

  1.  Are you sitting comfortably in your chair? Sounds simple, but I find a lot of students are so focused on their work that they loose track of good posture.
  2. Are you sitting half way between the front and back of the chair seat? This position will give you the maximum amount of room to turn or pivot in your chair.
  3. If you have a sore back or existing back condition, have you supported your back appropriately? This is the exception to the item above because you must support your back if that’s what it needs. Don’t forget that twisting your back is not an option and a chair with wheels may be necessary.
  4. Do you have your feet planted firmly on the floor? Hello. Put both feet on the floor for the best ergonomics and grounding. If you need a small stool, have one nearby.
  5. Is the table at a comfortable height? Is it approximately at elbow height? Table height will be different for everyone but in general don’t have your hands too high or too low when you’re working.
  6. Are your shoulders relaxed when doing the work? If they start to hurt, holding tension your shoulders while working is likely the culprit – pay attention to this especially if you have a previous injury.
  7. Are your wrists and hands aligned and in a comfortable “relaxed and straight” position? Remember to change hand direction and not use your dominant hand for all the work. Keeping wrists relaxed and relatively straight will minimize strain.
  8. Is there room at the end of the table for your arms to be supported? I like my clients feet on the table so I can rest my arms while working. If you like the feet off the table, well, I don’t know how you keep your arms up for 6 or 7 hours a day… if they do get tired, I invite you to try my method.
  9. Do you hold the foot with a loose, relaxed hand? When practitioners are just starting out there is a lot to pay attention to – okay, there is always a lot to pay attention to – and I’ve observed some students use a hold that I call “the death grip”. They are hanging on for dear life. Lighten up, especially while doing the relaxation techniques.
  10. Do you use a moderate touch while thumb-walking? There is a range of techniques and pressures and you need to know how to do them all because there is a time and a place for everything. However, there are many reflexologists who do just fine with the lightest of touch and others who have the physical strength and the inclination to go deep and stay there. Both of these styles and all those in between work, so use the pressure that will give you in the best ergonomics.
  11. Do you change postures regularly? Movement is so important. The more you can move the less apt you’ll be to stay in a position that’s not working for you.
  12. Do you take a break and stretch between sessions or at least once every hour? Those of you who do yoga know that when you do a twist or a stretch, you do a counter twist or stretch soon after. Because we often reach forward with our arms, a counter stretch and shaking out the arms makes sense too.
  13. Do you occasionally stand to work? I love to stand at various points during a session to get a better position for working and it reminds me to stay loose.
  14. Do you vary your thumb-walking to suit the angle or surface texture of the foot? Change directions and/or change hands so you can get deeper into the tissue from a different angle. This is not about pressure it’s about connecting with the reflexes.
  15. Do you insert relaxation techniques within the session for variety and ergonomic relief? I do this all the time. I call them desserts and before or after I detail an area, or if the client has felt some sensitivity, I reward them (and me) with a yummy relaxation technique.

I know you’re doing most of these things, but if you find even one item on this list that could be improved… well, my work here is done.

It pays to take care of yourself and your ergonomics. The reward can be a long and prosperous career.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills. Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

 

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training “THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology and Carpal Tunnel – What every Reflexologist Needs to Know!

April 30, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

Every reflexologist needs to know about the carpal tunnel. It’s important because you’ll have clients that complain about it. Equally important – you want to avoid getting carpal tunnel syndrome yourself. And, if you already have it you need to be especially careful.

You’ve heard me say this over and over again – reflexologists don’t treat, don’t prescribe and don’t diagnose. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t know what’s going on.

Clients often hope that reflexology will be a magic bullet to their health woes. I can’t say it will be, and I can’t help but smile too.

Why? Because, most people report a reduction in pain and/or symptoms (for just about any condition in the body) with Hand Reflexology. That’s true for local issues on the hands too – even though they’re not our intended destination.

This is important – let me explain.

Carpal tunnel syndrome has probably been around since the beginning of time. It’s hallmark is pain and discomfort in the hand and even weakness in the forearm. The most likely cause is a nerve that’s being compressed in your wrist. As a medical condition, it can lead to numbness, wrist pain, parasthesia and weakness in the area.

There are 3 nerves that cross the wrist into the hand, but only two move through the carpal tunnel. One is the median nerve, which is responsible for sensation to the palm, the thumb and next three fingers (but not the little finger). This important nerve controls impulses to the muscles of the hand that allow the fingers and thumb to coordinate their movements.

Common causes of carpal tunnel syndrome are from irritation or thickening from injury or swelling in the wrist which narrows the tunnel. When this happens, it can cause the median nerve to be compressed.

Symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome

Most often the symptoms of carpal tunnel will occur only in the parts of the hand supplied by the median nerve which include the first three fingers and half the fourth but not the little finger. This is useful to know because if the little finger is not affected, this may be taken as a positive sign for carpal tunnel syndrome, and not ulnar nerve compression.

Reports are that symptoms start gradually and are described as a burning sensation or an itching or numbness in the palm of the hand and the fingers. The thumb, the index finger and the middle fingers are also implicated.

Some symptoms to watch out for are:

Pain in the fingers (less commonly in the palm), weakness, numbness or tingling in the hand

Forearm, wrist or palm pain

Pain or numbness that intensifies more at night than during the day. Some have reported that the pain will wake them from sleep and require them to shake out their hand or rub it to get some relief.

An increase in pain the more the wrist or hand is used

Difficulty gripping things

Thumb weakness

Fact: The incidence of carpal tunnel is three times more likely to occur in women than in men (possibly because the carpal tunnel in women may be smaller).

Causes

The causes of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome are thought to be due to repetitive motions, work conditions or a number of other underlying medical problems.

Other causes that could lead to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome are:

Inflammatory diseases like Rheumatoid Arthritis at the wrist

Diabetes or other endocrine disorders including hypothyroidism

Pregnancy

Wrist injury or fracture

Even alcoholism

Risk associated with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

The following are risk factors associated with the development of carpal tunnel syndrome:

Intense or direct pressure to the wrist

Repetition

Compression or a blow of high force

A joint position that is awkward

Too much or prolonged vibration

Working for too long in a constrained position

Poor ergonomics

Diagnosis

If you, or your client has some or all of these symptoms – unless you’re a medical professional you cannot diagnose it.

In fact, when a client tells me they have carpal tunnel syndrome I always ask who made the diagnosis. It makes a difference whether it was a doctor or a specialist – or their aunt Betty or someone at the local gym.

There are a few simple tests that can be done to check general function of the wrist (you’ll learn those in the Hand Reflexology Workshop and more). This will help emphasize the importance for your client to seek the appropriate medical help.

Of course, early diagnosis and treatment are important to avoid risking damage to the median nerve (which at some point may become permanent).

A doctor will examine the neck, shoulders, hands and arms to see if the patient’s complaints are due to an underlying pathology or to activities.

In addition to examining the wrist for signs of swelling, tenderness, heat or discoloration each finger will also be tested for pain and sensation and the muscles at the heel of the hand will also be tested for strength and examined for signs of atrophy.

The routinly used laboratory tests and X-rays can be instrumental in revealing underlying issues such as fractures, arthritis and diabetes.

Treatment… to be continued next week.

As always, there’s so much more I’d like to share with you. I’ll be continuing with more great Hand Reflexology information in the next newsletter.

Or, take the last spot in my 2012 Hand Reflexology Workshop.

Here’s to your reflexology health!

Enjoy your wonderful Reflexology skills.

© Wendy Coad
Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology & Atheletes Foot

April 2, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

I’ve been practicing for so long that I remember when I trained, we worked with people with their socks on. At the time it was considered appropriate – especially if they had a foot fungus.

That was silly, because socks are not a barrier to foot fungus, aka – athletes foot. If there’s a fungus on the foot then there’s a fungus on the sock and there’s a fungus in the shoe.

Before you say eeewwww, remember that the fungus that causes athletes foot is a thing of nature and found just about everywhere. It’s on the floor and on the door and in the air too.

But it won’t thrive in most places. It thrives mainly in places that are:

1. warm

2. dark

3. damp

And that’s why the warm, damp feet of perspiration soaked athletes (feet that are housed in the darkness of a shoe that’s been worn over and over) is like a holiday cruise for that fungus. It never wants to leave.

I’ll often send my clients who have what looks like athletes foot to see an appropriate professional for help, like their local pharmacist or podiatrist. There are many over-the-counter and prescription medicines that are said to help.

But, if the client fails to also do a few simple things that I’ve listed below, the likelihood for success is diminished.

If you are actively trying to eliminate a fungus, you have to actively “clean up” its immediate environment, and by that I mean minimize the warm, dark, damp factor as much as possible.

How?

Follow these steps:

1. Switch to a cotton (or a wool blend) sock – when fighting fungus you need to minimize the warmth and moisture factor and natural fibers will absorb moisture and/or keep the foot “cooler”. Nylon and polyester socks are like mini saunas and need to be avoided for the time being. A blend is okay as long as it’s 80% natural and no more than 20% synthetic.

Change your socks every day (at least).

2. Never wear the same pair of shoes every day. Fungus can stay active for up to 3 days in a shoe so you want to let the pair of shoes you wore on Monday air-out until Thursday before you put them on again. Otherwise, and especially if you are treating the foot, you will likely transfer the same fungus back to the foot, and so on… foot to shoe… shoe to foot.

3. Remember to dry between your toes after taking a bath, a shower, after exercise and at the end of every day. This is sometimes hard for the elderly because it requires some flexibility that they may no longer have. It might explain be why foot fungus is more prevalent amongst the elderly too.

What about reflexology?

Well, for starters athletes foot is contraindicated for foot reflexology because it might be transmitted. And, it’s just plain uncomfortable – dry, itchy, rash-like, with broken skin – especially between the toes.

That’s why there’s hand reflexology, so work on the hands until the feet clear up.

Thinking about it, if fungus is everywhere then it’s the job of the immune system to protect us. If a fungus has gotten past it, then a detail to the immune system reflexes is in order.

If medication is being used, supporting the body in its natural detoxification processes with a focus on the elimination systems might be helpful, including the colon, kidney, lung and liver reflexes.

Include the parathyroid reflex too (in my last newsletter I wrote about psoriasis, another skin condition, and how calcium is sometimes not balanced in the area of concern).

That should clear up some of the mystery surrounding “tinea pedis” (the Latin name for foot fungus) so that your clients can enjoy the wonderful benefits of reflexology.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology and Meridians

March 26, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

I’ve been having so much fun and getting such a great response from my tele-classes that I’m expanding into offering longer distance-learning programs.

My first offering will most likely be my full Reflexology and Meridians workshop.

It takes a lot of time and effort to put everything into a video format, but I think that it’s well worth it, especially with a fascinating subject like meridians. It’s a subject, like reflexology, that has ancient roots.

And why would a reflexologist want to study the meridians?

Well, for one reason half of the 12 pairs of meridians in the body, begin or end on the feet and the other half begin or end on the hands.

Whether you know it or not, when you give a reflexology session, you are also covering many meridians.

If you’ve ever learned an oriental exercise (chi gong, tai chi) or bodywork technique (shiatsu, acupressure, anma) you know that the foundation of all of them, in their theory and practice includes the meridians.

Have you ever wondered, as you practice your reflexology, why you’re noticing something (especially on the top of the foot) that just doesn’t match your reflex map?

Welcome to “Meridian Land”.

You can ignore it and continue to do great reflexology, but by paying attention, you can combine the best of both worlds and offer even greater results to your clients.

And so, why wouldn’t you? The meridians are already there ready to access and add yet another layer of healing support to your session.

To give you an example, one of my favorite meridian points is “stomach 41”. It’s located at the mid-point of the dorsal ankle crease.

For a long time I felt that there was more to the “fallopian tube/vas deferens reflex” because so many clients who had no issues there, still responded to the reflex. Until I connected it to the meridians it remained somewhat of a mystery.

What does the meridian “stomach 41” support? Abdominal disorders, cramps, dizziness, headaches vertigo, ankle joints… for starters.

Now, you may already have some background in oriental medicine. I’ve had many acupuncturists take my reflexology classes and I will always acknowledge that the meridians and all that surrounds them runs much deeper and much more complicated than what I’m discussing here.

You can study the meridians and oriental medicine for years and still just be touching the surface.

But, I do believe that with the knowledge we have about the reflexes, and with some understanding of the meridians that are found on the hands and the feet, we can elevate our skills even higher.

And, that’s what I love about reflexology.

Enjoy your wonderful Reflexology skills.

© Wendy Coad

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology & Psoriasis

March 26, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

One of the things that I love about reflexology is that it is efficient, effective and it has a wonderful knack for reducing the symptoms of just about anything that ails you.

Take psoriasis, for example. Although reflexology is never considered a cure for any disease, many people have tried reflexology when all else failed. Reports indicate that it often helps.

As a skin disorder, psoriasis may appear as a red scaly rash, a patch of inflamed skin that is often too tender to touch. It can also have blisters or thick plaques that have a silvery shine.

Basically the normal process of skin renewal is on overdrive and new skin cells form more rapidly.

Now, we know that the skin is the largest organ for elimination. It’s through the skin via perspiration that many toxins are excreted.

You can also think of the skin as an organ of respiration because it allows your body to absorb or inhale and release or exhale.

Almost two square yards in size, it removes waste and toxins from the body joining the liver, kidneys, lymph, large intestines and lungs in this process.

If elimination is less than optimum in any or all of these organs, how is it not possible that the skin will reflect this in some way?

Of course stress is the number one factor in almost all pathologies so reducing stress is a great and efficient way to start.

What is my reflexology focus?

A good place to start is with a reflexology de-stressing protocol. Be sure to include the adrenal reflexes for their connection to stress reduction and additionally their help in reducing inflammation.

Next, detail all the other elimination organ reflexes: liver, kidneys, lymph, large intestines and lungs. Psoriasis can allow more calcium to be removed from the affected skin, so consider detailing the parathyroid reflexes for their support of calcium balance.

Don’t forget that the skin with psoriasis can be thick and hard and prone to cracking. You’ll need to avoid any open fissures or sores. If this occurs on the feet, you can work on the hands and vice versa.

The relief that reflexology can bring to people who suffer from psoriasis and its many underlying issues is just one of the reasons that I love what I do.

Enjoy your wonderful Reflexology skills.

© Wendy Coad

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology and Zone Therapy

March 8, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

Here’s a recent video class I’d like to share with you. I know that the “overhead projector” is a bit “old school” but I do love to write on my maps, so I’ll likely keep using it… for now.

Click on the image or the links below to view the video.

Click on the video image above or click here to watch the video

Email your comments to me at info@reflexologyprof.com – tell me what you liked and any constructive comments.

Thanks and enjoy your wonderful Reflexology skills.

© Wendy Coad

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Foot Factors From Around the World

December 31, 2011 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

  1. The first place I looked for a custom that involves the respectful touching of feet was India. Steeped with ritual and ceremony, it has long been practiced that children bow down to touch the feet of their grandparents or of their elders. This practice is followed by either a blessing or a hug by the elder as an acknowledgement of the respect and love they feel.
  2. In the Native American culture, drums were played with the feet. The Aztec and Hopi Indians used hollowed logs with wooden coverings that when danced upon would resonate.
  3. African and Indian cultures, along with others, have a tradition whereby a specialist is called in to paint intricate designs on the hands and feet of the wedding party. This custom is thought to bring good luck to the bride and groom and to ward off evil.
  4. In Asian cultures, depictions of the footprint of Buddha carries great spiritual meaning. As many as 65 symbols for devotion can be found in these carvings and paintings. The central image on the foot is that of a wheel with 8 spokes. Each spoke represents part of the eightfold path to enlightenment.  It’s interesting to me that this symbol is in the same location as our reflexology “Solar Plexus” reflex. I’ve always felt that there is a lot of wisdom and spiritual connections in this potent point.
  5. A ritual that is said to originate as a hospitality practice in ancient times was the custom of foot washing. Even the kings of europe engaged in this practice in the royal courts up until the 20th century. Washing the feet of guests was once a common practice and has endured in religious ceremonies to the present day.
  6. Sumo wrestling is an ancient Japanese practice which dates back many thousands of years. Seeped in ritual that is said to originate with the Shinto religion, the wrestlers perform a foot stomping ceremony (Shiko) to initiate the event and salt is then used to purify the ritual.
  7. My favorite is practiced by mothers around the world. I call them the first reflexologists, naturally. Yes, it’s mothers and sometimes fathers, aunts, uncles, siblings, cousins and babysitters who have all found that “one common denominator” when communicating with babies.

I’m talking about the ancient practice of “this little piggy went to market” or whatever else it’s called in as many languages as there are cultures.

Where would we be as a species without the delightful and spontaneous practice of playfully pressing and gently squeezing babies toes? This is something that comes as naturally as rocking them in a cradle. We’ve all done it and all had it done to us.

But, think about it for a minute. What reflexes are being supported and stimulated here? You got it…. the CNS. And what is expanding exponentially as babies grow and learn. Right again! It’s their brain and nervous system (along with all other parts of their bodies).

I think that moms just “get it”, and their preliminary efforts at reflexology can and do have a positive effect. Why else would it be practiced everywhere, ever since time or toes began.

So, there you have it. I invite you to celebrate your (or someone else’s) feet for the next 7 days or seven weeks (or 7 minutes) by foot bowing, dancing, foot painting, solar plexus holding, foot washing, foot stomping and please, don’t forget to wiggling those toes.

Happy New Year from the Reflexology Professor!

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

How Steve Cured His Foot Pain

December 31, 2011 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

Steve comes to my classes to teach part of the Anatomy and Physiology. As a psycho-pharmacologist (he helps people with emotional disturbances and when appropriate, to use medication wisely), he has a great knowledge of the body and, obviously, the brain. He’ll be the first one to tell you that reflexology affects the parasympathetic nervous system.  And, he “works for reflexology” because every time he teaches, as payment, he’ll get a session from one of the students during our practice sessions. (This is a real hands-on class – we practice our techniques every day.)

So, when he had foot pain, I wanted to pay him back for all the support he’s given me. I gave him a soothing foot reflexology session before he went to bed. (I was also thinking about the late night project I might do with all the great energy I’d be generating for myself.)

Now, as a reflexologist, my first thoughts were not about Steve’s feet! As I worked, I asked him to tell me what areas, if any, were tender. I also noticed the areas where there was a change in the tissue texture.I won’t give away all his secrets, but you can be sure there was a connection between the areas of tenderness and health/diet issues.The feet are such gossips, they will tell you everything.

So, I asked a few questions relating to the spine and the organs in the abdominal cavity. It’s not about being a genius, it’s just about asking useful questions (something else you learn in class).

I would never tell anyone that there’s something wrong. They would have to see a medical practitioner for that. (Reflexologists never diagnose, treat or prescribe!)

We can be intelligent though and once issues are confirmed, our conversation centered around which diet/lifestyle, etc., changes could best help.

As a reflexologist, my main interest is in the body, the organs and organ systems. But, I know there’s still a foot (or two) involved.
I wanted to help there too.

So I asked Steve what he already knew to do… “tell me something that’s helped you in the past” (commonly, this isn’t the first time a problem appears in the area).
Since we’d covered this territory before, Steve knew that soaking his feet in alternating warm/hot and cool/cold water helps a lot. He also knew that specific, light exercise (the ones we learned in class) and working some very tight muscles on his leg helped too. Asking the question reminded him of that.
Although he was told by a podiatrist that he had a heel spur and it would need cortizone shots,  he opted for my reflexology and his own hot and cold hydro-therapy techniques.

After a short while, his pain was almost completely gone. That was several years ago now and it has never come back.
My work with my favorite client may never be done (and, I hope not). But, there’s nothing more satisfying to a reflexologist (and a wife) than knowing that I can help.
And, he’s taking responsibility for his own body – he knows where to go for help, and… how to help himself.
I wish the same for all.
Happy Holidays.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

“Cranial” Reflexology

December 2, 2011 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

One of the first things I learn when I studied Cranio-sacral Balancing is that the body has a symphony of rhythms, each in concert with the other.

There’s a very special rhythm created by the movement of the cerebral-spinal fluid, which baths our brain and spine like a tide that washes up and down it’s length.

And, there’s a pulse that is palpable which follows the flow of this tide. The rate of this rhythm is approximately seven beats per minute.

So, in addition to our heart rhythm and the rhythm of our breathing, our whole skeletal system gently pulses – inverts and everts – to the flow of the cranial-spinal fluid.

It took me some time to learn how to palpate the cranial rhythm since it’s so deep within our body. It’s with the utmost respect and the deepest “listening“ through my fingertips that I finally sensed the magic of it’s movement.

As if that weren’t awesome enough, I learned that with the gentlest of techniques this primal motion could be safely paused, as if to set it to rest for a few seconds and up to several minutes.

It’s known as inducing the “still point.”

Once the cranial rhythm is put into a pause the body can rest in a natural way, freed momentarily from one more task, albeit a natural one.

This is where the deepest relaxation effect is to be had – like a mega alpha state where consciousness is well beneath the surface, but not to the point yet of unconsciousness.

We’ve all experienced it when we receive reflexology and our clients have too – that’s why we love our work so much, the relaxation effect of this state is profound.

An experienced crainio-sacral practitioner is very familiar with the still point and how to induce it. Once set into place, the practitioner need do nothing more than wait for the body to reset itself.

And the body will naturally resume its cranial rhythms, so slight and gentle that they are almost imperceptible even to the trained.

Along with this reset is the potential for irregularities in the natural movement to be corrected and be brought back into greater alignment.

So what does this have to do with reflexology and our solar plexus points?

When we hold these simple reflex points, we can naturally induce this state of deep relaxation – the “still point”.

By changing nothing that you already do, just be aware that your thumbs placed in the solar plexus center of both feet, with a hold that is both gentle and firm, will likely do what Cranio-sacral Balancing practitioners strive to do to help their clients.

It’s a good thing for body and soul.

Ever wonder why, at the end of your session when you hold these points, there’s yet another wave of relaxation that comes over your client?

Well, now you know and by doing nothing else, you’ve supplied a magical addition to your session.

And, that’s another reason why I begin and end every session with the solar plexus reflex.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

“About the Digestive System” – Reflexology Rules!

November 21, 2011 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

In Part 1 of this article, I talked about the digestive system along with its function and regulators. This is useful background information that will help you see the bigger picture and as a reflexologist, allow for informed choices on the selection of reflexes you might detail.

Keeping Digestion on Track

The kinds and amounts of food a person eats and how the digestive system processes that food play key roles in maintaining good health.

Eating a healthy diet is the best way to prevent common digestive problems. Having said that…

What can reflexology do?

You can see from the information in last week’s article that the digestive system is a vital and complex system that involves the whole body – digestive organs, nervous and endocrine systems.

Now we know where the digestive system is and how it functions in the body – let’s review the location of the reflexes on the feet.

Bilaterally, the digestive system reflexes occupy the area on the plantar surface of the feet, between our reflex landmarks of the diaphragm line and the pelvic line (exceptions are the esophagus and sigmoid colon reflexes).

If you follow the bones – the digestive system reflexes are superficial to the shafts and bases of the metatarsals and all of the bones of the mid-foot (the 3 cuneiforms, navicular and cuboid bones).

And, just as these organs are located on the left or right sides of the body, the reflexes will be found on the corresponding left or right foot. As above, so below.

I’m always on the lookout for changes in tissue texture in the soft arch of the foot. I call it the soft “belly of the foot” because that’s where the “belly” or digestive reflexes are mostly located.

The mere size of the digestive system reflexes on the feet, proportionately give feet a winning edge for addressing the digestive system over the hands, face or ear reflexes.

But, even though the feet have the space advantage, the other reflexology areas (hand, face and ears) are better for other reasons – like a deeper relaxation response – so don’t count them out.

If I’m not detailing a specific digestive organ reflex, I keep the techniques general.

Thumb-walking the 5 zones from the pelvic line to the diaphragm line essentially addresses the digestive system reflexes “en mass” (the sigmoid colon and rectum reflexes dip into the heel on the left foot).

Now, as a reflexologist it’s always a relief to me that we don’t treat, diagnose or prescribe.

But, as we know, everything in the body, all our systems and processes are affected by stress and not in a good way.

I know from the vast amount of research that’s out there now – reflexology can profoundly affect the parasympathetic nervous system and has the greatest potential to reduce stress.

It’s useful to “listen” very carefully to what the feet will tell you here. Any changes in tissue texture found on the arch will add the digestive system to my menu of reflex areas to detail in the session.

And, for self-help, the access we have to the “soft belly” or arch of the foot is such that it’s almost made to rest our hand and scoop into it.

Even a few minutes of general work can make a difference. But, when you detail the specific reflexes research proves that our effectiveness can increase threefold!

It’s apparent from last week’s article that both the endocrine system and the nervous system are featured prominently in our digestive processes and therefore those reflexes would be important too.

Key steps for your digestive health

It’s important to keep in mind that we are what we eat. Choosing the right food and eating in a calming environment is ideal.

These tips will help you maintain better digestive system health:

  • Choose high quality, fresh organic foods – raw foods have their own enzymes which are especially important when your body is healing and may be low on enzymes in general.
  • Chew your food thoroughly – Digestion of carbs like starch and sugar, begins when they are mixed with saliva and enzymes in your mouth. The role of the enzymes is twofold, to break down your food, and to also attack bacteria.
  • Don’t rush when you’re eating – take your time and sit down to eat. It sounds obvious, but a lot of people hurry their meals.
  • If you drink a beverage with your meal make sure it’s room temperature – If you drink ice cold liquid with your food, your body has to heat it first and that takes more time and energy away from the digestive process. Drinking enough water is always a good idea and it will aid all your body’s processes. But drinking it (or any beverage) cold with your meal will slow digestion down. Enough said.

There’s so much I’d like to share with you on this topic, so I’ll be adding more future newsletters.

I’ll be talking more specifically about each organ of the Digestive System individually in future Reflexology Newsletters and on my Blog www.ReflexologySuccess.com

As Charles T. Copeland once said:

“To eat is human, to digest divine.”

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

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