One Reflexology Question Not to Miss

June 27, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

As reflexologists, we all keep records of our clients contact information and health history, including what their chief complaints are.

It’s a standard in the field and if you’re nationally ARCB certified, you already have what I think is the best client intake form ever. For those of you who aren’t (why wouldn’t you be?) there are client health history forms in many books.

Some intake forms are long and some are short, but there’s one very important question that I hope you are asking.

On the surface this question might not seem as important as many of the others. Don’t be fooled by how simple it is. Early in my career, I wasn’t sure how important it was but I quickly learned its value, and now I never start without it:

“How would you rate your present state of health? (circle one) Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor.”

That’s it. Almost…

It’s not enough to stop there because after getting the answer, I then need to ask one more question.

After looking at the client’s answer, my next question is… “and what would it take for you to say _____”?

For example, if they reported an answer of “Good”, next I’ll say “and what would it take for you to say – Excellent”?

If they reported Fair, I’ll say “and what would it take for you to say, Good… or Excellent”?

If they reported Poor, I’ll say “and what would it take for you to say, Fair… Good… or Excellent”?

The only time I don’t use this second question is if they say they already rate their current health as “Excellent”. There’s always room for improvement, but I usually take an “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” attitude here.

Okay, getting back to the second question… are you seeing a pattern here?

Why would I want to know what it would take for some improvement to occur? Haven’t I already gotten information about past and recent illness, injury, etc.

Yes indeed. And I will definitely work to help the organ system reflexes, but this particular question is more about quality of life. It points to health goals and personal goals like no other question can.

Let me give you an example: “Client 1” reports that they would rate their present state of health as “Good”. (Remember, I already have the health history, so it’s great information in addition to all the rest.)

I’ll ask: “and what would it take for you to say… Excellent”?

They might report that they are trying to lose some weight, or report that they would like to exercise more, or have some time for themselves.

That’s when I become a “cheer-leader” for these quality of life goals.

Once I have this information I can align with supporting them in this aspect of their journey as well.

I’ll have suggestions or referrals to make. It might be simple ideas about exercise or diet, or I might know someone who I can refer them to for more expert advice.

Sometimes just talking about these goals will start the wheels turning in their head as well as mine… and sometimes not. I never force the conversation and I will ask for their permission before I make my suggestions. That way I’ll stay within their expectations for a reflexology session and my scope of practice.

This is always a great component to the session, so don’t lose out on this additional supportive opportunity.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology & Yorick

June 18, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

Hamlet: “Alas, poor Yorick! …he hath borne me on his back a thousand times.”

Yorick’s skull: “If you ask me, I’m still carrying the whole scene!”

— Christopher Reeve as Hamlet, on The Muppet Show

It’s hard for me to believe that even today, there are people who can’t tell the difference between reflexology and massage.

Now there’s nothing wrong with massage and a good foot massage can be wonderful. It’s a personal preference and personally, I’ll keep looking until I find an actual reflexologist.

When I went to massage school I knew, as soon as my neck sent shooting tingles and numbness down my right arm, that at my age I was not going to last long in such a labor-intensive field.

(In a recent job analysis it was found that the average age of a reflexologist is 51 and she already has a college education. While researching massage, I found that on average a massage therapist is no longer working in the field after about 2 years, in part because of the strain on the body.)

But because of my training, I can now say with some authority that reflexology has little or nothing to do with massage and here, quite simply, is the reason why.

The focus of massage is the soft tissue of the body. When giving a massage, the focus is predominantly on the muscles, tendons, ligaments, attachments, connective tissue, etc.

Sure, when giving a massage you consider the whole body, but I guarantee that when a massage therapist is working on the gastrocnemius their focus is on the leg, the back, and not on a specific organ – like the kidneys, the colon or any other organ in the body.

But, when I work with reflexology, my focus is almost entirely aimed towards the organ systems of the body. I care less about the foot – it’s muscles and attachments – than I do about the kidneys, the liver, the large and small intestines, the heart or the thyroid, to name a few. And, although I’m not treating these organs, as a reflexologist my goal is to “energetically” support their function.

The focus of massage is on the muscles. The focus of reflexology is on the organs. Period.

If we take a look at the history of reflexology, it’s closest parallel is more likely to be with chiropractics than with massage.

Now this, I can understand. (And, no – there is no bone crunching with reflexology… ever!)

The premise of chiropractics is that the alignment of the spine has an impact on all of the organs on the body. Therefore good spine alignment is necessary for optimum health and poor alignment can impact the organs in a negative way.

Of course spinal alignment can be an aggressive procedure and in the mid 1900’s there were several well-publicized cases where people died from chiropractics.

I believe this was one of the reasons that, as recently as the 1960’s, chiropractics was outlawed (as in not legal to practice) in many states – including New York!

Another reason proved to be what I call “turf wars” between chiropractors and allopathic medicine.

They had to fight for many years and their case went through several court systems until eventually a U. S. District Court Judge decided that the American Medical Association “had engaged in a lengthy, systematic, successful and unlawful boycott, designed to eliminate the profession of chiropractic as a competitor.”

But now, instead of being called “an unscientific cult” and “the chiropractic menace”, you can become a Doctor of Chiropractics.

As for the science and medicine behind chiropractics, they have a similar anecdotal history with no absolute scientific proof, just like reflexology.

I’ve never heard of reflexology causing death but maybe in the early days, while our histories were more parallel, if it had…. we’d all be “Doctors of Reflexology” too.

I’m truly glad that our gentle, non-invasive techniques have never been proven to harm anyone… but please, don’t tell me that reflexology is massage either.

chirobase.org/05RB/BCC/postscript.html

chiroeco.com/news/chiropractic-news.php?id=2685

wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_chiropractic

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.comand join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology and mom

May 15, 2012 by  
Filed under Reflexology Tips

Until quite recently, I’d forgotten that I’d been around reflexology at a very young age.

You see my great uncle Alvin was a reflexologist which he combined with his pedorthy practice.

In those days, pedorthy – shoe sizing, measuring and fitting footwear – was a more common professional career. People knew how important the feet are and took better care of them back then.

Uncle Alvin was practicing reflexology as early as the 1940’s.

When my brother was young he had asthma and hay-fever. It almost killed him once – so my mom took him to my uncle for reflexology.

She said it helped a lot.

Mom was always one to try things she thought were important. One day while I was visiting, a few years before she went into the nursing home, she reached into the back of her closet and pulled out a small packet of papers.

“Here” she said, “I saved these for you, dear. I thought you’d like to have them one day”.

I looked at the neatly folded papers, one with an old stamp of a young Queen and another a green brochure in a protective plastic bag.

It took me a moment to realize what these papers were.

As early as 1948, my mother had written a letter to Eunice Ingham requesting information on a “reflexologist in our area… for a friend”.

Eunice wrote back on the same typed page mom had sent her and reported she didn’t know specifically of anyone, but that buying one of her books could certainly help.

A reflexologist AND a business woman!

The other papers were flyers for reflexology workshops and forms to order books. All kept safe for so many years.

But, in my hands was the reflexologists equivalent of an ingot of pure gold.

Nothing could have made me happier.

I talk about my mother, Irene, often because she’s been an inspiration to me my whole life. And, she still is.

Towards the end of her life, she had Alzheimer’s disease, was blind, and no longer able to communicate very well.

Irene was well into her nineties, still an amazing person and luckily, she was in an amazing eldercare facility. Even though her recollection of me had grown dim at best, we spend lots of wonderful time together.

Sometimes we talk about the very distant past. At various times she considers me her mother, father, daughter, sister or… a stranger.

One thing we could always do together was reflexology. And since her hands were so easy to reach, I’d often give her a soothing Hand Reflexology session.

Although the disease had decreased her responsiveness, as soon as I’d take her hand she’d turns towards me and smile.

Because of her cataracts, she could no longer see me but she could feel the warmth of my hands and the love in my touch.

It was such a gift to be able to communicate with her in this way because so many avenues, that I once took for granted, had since been cut off.

We’d sit together, her hand in mine and I’d slowly and gently do some relaxation techniques. I’d use a little extra lotion and was careful not to pull the dorsal skin. With age her skin became extremely thin and the vessels were very prominent. On the palm side, I’d scoop my fingertips in just a little bit.

Her hands were often cold so I’d wrap my hand around each finger and give a gentle squeeze (instead of the usual “coin rubbing” technique).

Sometimes she’d squeeze my hand back as if to say she’s happy I was there.

Holding each finger, just as I described, offers soothing balance to all the chakra elements: earth, water, fire, air and ether.

And, I’d remember that half the meridians in the body: lung, large intestine, triple energizer, pericardium, heart and small intestine, begin or end on each finger tip! (You’ll learn this, and a whole lot more, in the Professor’s Hand Reflexology program.)

Irene would usually be sitting in a chair that’s part-chair and part-bed. She could no longer walk at this point. There were not a lot of movements she could do.

It was incredible that she had no specific health issues. Still, all her systems were wearing down. She had none of the actions, movements – bending and straightening – that keeps us mobile with everything moving.

Although she wasn’t able to use the normal mechanics for system support and balance, I deeply trusted that these gentle Hand Reflexology sessions helped her organ systems as well as all the fluid tides.

So, I’d focus on the general session sequence. And use just a fraction of the pressure and one quarter of the usual session time.

There we sit, together for those precious moments, in deep connection and communication without needing to say any words.

And, I’ll treasure these moments forever.

The elderly and particularly nursing home patients are often stressed, disoriented and deprived of safe and meaningful touch.

To just take their hand in a compassionate way can have a tremendous impact.

You can just imagine what a soothing and relaxing touch – combined with the benefits of Reflexology – can do.

Remember to check with the medical staff before embarking on any technique with the elderly population.

I’m forever grateful for my sweet reflexology skills. They have given me a world where the possibilities are profound and endless.

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.ReflexologyProf.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”

Reflexology and Carpal Tunnel – What Every Reflexologist Needs to Know! Part II

May 15, 2012 by  
Filed under Articles by Wendy

Last week I wrote Part I of this article “Reflexology and Carpal Tunnel”

If you want to read Part I go to: www.ReflexologySuccess.com where past articles are available.

It’s what every reflexologist needs to know and included:
– Anatomy

– Symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome

– Causes

– Risks associated with the disease

– Diagnosis

This week I’ll continue with:

– Treatment

– Non-surgical treatments

– Exercise, and

– What Can Reflexology Do?

Part II

Treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome vary and should begin as early as possible, under a doctor’s direction.

Underlying causes such as diabetes or arthritis should be treated first.

If there is inflammation, applying cool packs can help reduce swelling.

Non-surgical treatments

There are a couple of homeopathic creams that might help the symptoms:

Brands like Traumeel (a calendula and arnica based ointment) and Topricin (with 11 homeopathic ingredients) have both shown effectiveness and are available in many health food stores.

In special circumstances, various drugs can ease the pain and swelling associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. NSAIDS such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and other nonprescription pain relievers, may ease symptoms that have been present for a short time or have been caused by strenuous activity.

Alternative support therapies – Hand Reflexology, Acupuncture and Chiropractic care have benefited so me patients. (The problem could be caused or exaserbated by even a slight misalignment of the carpals)

Exercise – Stretching and strengthening exercises can be helpful in people whose symptoms have abated.

Doctors will sometimes suggest that one wear a wrist splint (can be purchased at most drugstores) to keep the wrist in a neutral position at rest. Splinting is usually tried for a period of 4-6 weeks.

What can Reflexology Do?

As a reflexologist, why would I even care about carpal tunnel syndrome if it’s not my job to fix it? Well, I do care, but my primary considerations are the reflexes.

Remember, if you or anyone you know even thinks they have this problem – it’s very important they get the appropriate medical attention.

And, I’m repeating myself here too – with any illness, stress is always a factor. Rest is important and the stress relief that Hand Reflexology brings is a wonderful component to any health maintenance regime.

If carpal tunnel is acute (meaning it hurts or it’s active now) you won’t want to work on the area directly.

There are a lot of things to know and even more to think a bout. Be very careful with any nerve impingement.

I’ve learned this from my own experience – nerves do not like to be irritated – because it just make them, well, crankier. Not good.

If you’re trained in Hand Reflexology you know that there are some very specific strategies to support the body in its own healing process.

And, what about the reflexes?

Good point. There are specific reflexes in the area and as a good reflexologist, you need to also be focused on the systems of the body.

Be curious about these reflex area – does the client also have sciatica? Do they have any reproductive or digestive issues?

Inherent in the Hand Reflexology techniques (I can’t say what others teach… maybe – not this much) are techniques that will let you work safely to relax the hand.

And, what if you don’t have this specific training? – I suggest that you work the good hand and the opposite foot – or the ears.

The benefits of reflexology can be nothing short of amazing.

And, it’s never been more apparen t than in the UK where an British media article from 2004 reports that; “According to a survey conducted on behalf of Yellow Pages…, the number of high street greengrocers has declined by almost 60 per cent in 10 years, while the number of reflexologists is up over 800 per cent.”

I rest my case.

As always, there’s so much more I’d like to share with you. I’ll be adding more great reflexology info
rmation in future newsletters.

Here’s to your good session (and business) health!

Enjoy your wonderful reflexology skills.

Wendy Coad – Online health and reflexology expert and the “Reflexology Professor” publishes the popular “Reflexology Secrets, Tips and Techniques” weekly email newsletter to subscribers from around the world. If you’re ready to enjoy health, express creativity, gain knowledge and skyrocket your reflexology or holistic health career, get your FREE tips now at http://www.reflexologyprof.com and join us at the top right corner.

To your reflexology success –

Reflex, Live Long and Prosper,

Creator of the Mega Reflexology Training

“THE FOOT FACTOR PROGRAM”